Abstract

Ian MacMillan has given legitimacy to the field of entrepreneurship. With the establishment of entrepreneurship as an academic subject at a renowned business school such as Wharton School of Business, the research field acquired the necessary legitimacy, thus making it possible for other universities and business schools in the US to follow suite. This attracted a number of talented young researchers and research students to the field, and especially to Ian MacMillan’s Snider Entrepreneurial Center at Wharton School of Business in Philadelphia, where MacMillan has created an international research environment within the field of entrepreneurship.

Keywords

Venture Capitalist Business Plan Corporate Entrepreneurship Entrepreneurship Research Business Venture 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

State-of-the-art articles

  1. Low, M.B. & MacMillan, I.C., 1988, Entrepreneurship: Past Research and Future Challenges, Journal of Management, 14, 2, 139–161.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Textbooks

  1. Block, Z. & MacMillan, I.C., 1993, Corporate venturing; creating new businesses within the firm, Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.Google Scholar
  2. McGrath, R.G. & MacMillan, I.C., 2000, The entrepreneurial mindset: strategies for continuously creating opportunities in an age of uncertainty, Boston, MA: Harvard Business School Press.Google Scholar

Corporate entrepreneurship

  1. Block, Z. & MacMillan, I.C., 1985, Milestones for Successful Venture Planning,Harvard Business Review, September-October, 184–197.Google Scholar
  2. Block, Z. & MacMillan, I.C., 1994, Market Entry Strategies for New CorporateVentures, in Hills, G.E. (ed.), Marketing and Entrepreneurship, Westport: Quorum.Google Scholar
  3. MacMillan, I.C. & Block, Z. & SubbaNarasimha, P.N., 1984, Obstacles and experience in corporate ventures, Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 280–293.Google Scholar
  4. MacMillan, I.C. & Day, D.L., 1987, Corporate ventures into industrial markets:dynamics of aggressive entry, Journal of Business Venturing, 2, 29–39.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. MacMillan, I.C. & George, R., 1985, Corporate venturing: Challenges for senior managers, Journal of Business Strategy, 5, 3, 34–44.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. McGrath, R.G. & MacMillan, I.C., 1995, Discovery-Driven Planning, Harvard Business Review, July-August.Google Scholar
  7. McGrath, R.G. & MacMillan, I.C. & Venkataraman, S., 1995, Defining and developing competence: A strategic process paradigm, Strategic Management Journal, 26, 251–275.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. McGrath, R.G. & Venkataraman, S. & MacMillan, I.C., 1994, The advantage chain: Antecedents to rents from internal corporate ventures, Journal of Business Venturing,9, 351–369.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Nerkar, A.A. & McGrath, R.G. & MacMillan, I.C., 1996, Three facets of satisfaction and their influence on the performance of innovation teams, Journal of Business Venturing, 11, 167–188.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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Entrepreneurship

  1. MacMillan, I.C., 1983, The Politics of New Venture Management, Harvard Business Review, 61, 6, 8–16.Google Scholar

Cross-cultural entrepreneurship

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  5. Scheinberg, S. & MacMillan, I.C., 1988, An 11 country study of motivations to start a business, Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 669–687.Google Scholar

Venture capital evaluation

  1. Dubini, P. & MacMillan, I.C., 1988, Entrepreneurial prerequisites in Venture Capital backed projects, Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 46–58.Google Scholar
  2. MacMillan, I.C. & Kulow, D.M. & Khoylian, R., 1988a, Venture Capitalists’involvement in their investments: Extent and performance, Journal of Business Venturing, 4, 27–47.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. MacMillan, I.C. & Kulow, D.M. & Khoylian, R., 1988b, Venture Capitalists’involvement in their investments: Extent and performance, Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 303–323.Google Scholar
  4. MacMillan, I.C. & Siegel, R. & SubbaNarasimha, P.N., 1985a, Criteria used by venture capitalists to evaluate new venture proposals, Journal of Business Venturing, 1, 119–128.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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  6. MacMillan, I.C. & SubbaNarasimha, P.N., 1985, Characteristics distinguishing funded from unfunded business plans evaluated by venture capitalists, Frontiers of Entrepreneurship Research, 404–413.Google Scholar
  7. MacMillan, I.C. & Zemann, L. & SubbaNarasimha, P.N., 1987, Criteria distinguishing successful from unsuccessful ventures in the venture screening process, Journal of Business Venturing, 2, 123–137.CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media, LLC 2010

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.School of Economics and Management Inst. Economic ResearchUniversity of LundLundSweden

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