Skip to main content

The Ecology of Entrepreneurship

  • Chapter

Part of the International Handbook Series on Entrepreneurship book series (IHSE,volume 2)

Keywords

  • Organizational Form
  • Niche Width
  • American Sociological Review
  • Entry Mode
  • Strategic Management Journal

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

This is a preview of subscription content, access via your institution.

Buying options

Chapter
USD   29.95
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • DOI: 10.1007/0-387-23622-8_9
  • Chapter length: 34 pages
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
eBook
USD   219.00
Price excludes VAT (USA)
  • ISBN: 978-0-387-23622-3
  • Instant PDF download
  • Readable on all devices
  • Own it forever
  • Exclusive offer for individuals only
  • Tax calculation will be finalised during checkout
Softcover Book
USD   279.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)
Hardcover Book
USD   279.99
Price excludes VAT (USA)

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  • Aldrich, H.E. and Wiedenmayer, G. (1993). From traits to rates: An ecological perspective on organizational foundings. In J. Katz and R., Advances in Entrepreneurship, Firm Emergence, and Growth, (pp.145–195). Greenwich, CT: JAI Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Banbury, C.M., & Mitchell, W. (1995). The effect of introducing important incremental innovations on market share and business survival. Strategic Management Journal, 16, S161–S182.

    Google Scholar 

  • Barnett, W.P., & Freeman, J. (2001). Too much of a good thing? Product proliferation and organizational failure. Organization Science, 12, 539–558.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Barnett W.P., & Sorenson, O. (2002). The Red Queen in organizational creation and development. Industrial and Corporate Change, 11, 289–325.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Barnett, W.P., Swanson, A.N., & Sorenson, O. (2003). Asymmetric selection among organizations. Industrial and Corporate Change, 12, 673–695.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Baron, J.N. (2004). Employing identities in organizational ecology. Industrial and Corporate Change, 13, 3–32.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Barron, D.N. (1992). The analysis of count data: Overdispersion and autocorrelation. In P.V. Marsden, Sociological Methodology 1992 (pp. 179–220). Oxford. Basil Blackwell.

    Google Scholar 

  • Barron, D.N., West, E., & Hannan, M.T. (1994). A time to grow and a time to die: Growth and mortality of credit unions in New York City, 1914–1990. American Journal of Sociology, 100, 381–421.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Baum J.A.C., & Haveman, H.A. (1996). Love thy neighbor? Differentiation and agglomeration in the Manhattan hotel industry, 1898–1990. Administrative Science Quarterly, 42, 304–338.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Baum, J.A.C., Kom, H.J., & Kotha, S. (1995). Dominant designs and population dynamics in telecommunications services: Founding and failure of facsimile transmission service organizations, 1965–1992. Social Science Research, 24, 97–135.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Baum, J.A.C., & Oliver, C. (1996). Towards an institutional ecology of organizational founding. Academy of Management Journal, 39, 1378–1427.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Baum, J.A.C., & Singh, J.V. (1994). Organizational niches and the dynamics of organizational mortality. American Journal of Sociology, 100, 346–380.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Boone, C., Brocheler, V., & Carroll, G.R. (2000). Custom service: Application and tests of resource-partitioning theory among Dutch auditing firms for 1896 to 1992. Organization Studies, 21, 355–381.

    Google Scholar 

  • Boone, C., Carroll, G.R., & van Witteloostuijn, A. (2002). Resource distributions and market partitioning: Dutch daily newspapers, 1968 to 1994. American Sociological Review, 67, 408–31.

    Google Scholar 

  • Brittain, J.W., & Freeman, J. (1986). Entrepreneurship in the semiconductor industry. Unpublished manuscript, University of California, Berkeley, CA.

    Google Scholar 

  • Bruderl, J., & Schussler, R. (1990). Organizational mortality: The liabilities of newness and adolescence. Administrative Science Quarterly, 35, 530–547.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Bruderl, J., Preisendorfer, P., & Ziegler, R. (1992). Survival chances of newly founded business organizations. American Sociological Review, 57, 227–242.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, G.R. (1985). Concentration and specialization: Dynamics of niche width in populations of organizations. American Journal of Sociology, 90, 1262–1283.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, G.R. (1997). Long-term evolutionary change in organizational populations. Industrial and Corporate Change, 6, 119–143.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, G.R., Bigelow, L.S., Seidel, M.D., & Tsai, L.B. (1996). The fates of de novo and de alio producers in the American automobile industry 1885–1981. Strategic Management Journal, 17, 117–137.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, G.R., & Delacroix, J. (1982). Organizational mortality in the newspaper industries of Argentina and Ireland: An ecological approach. Administrative Science Quarterly, 27, 169–198.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, G.R., Delacroix, J., & Goodstein, J. (1988). The political environments of organizations: An ecological view. Research in Organizational Behavior, 10, 359–392.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, G.R., & Hannan, M.T. (2000). The demography of corporations and industries. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, G.R., & Huo, Y.P. (1986). Organizational task and institutional environments in ecological perspective: Findings from the local newspaper industry. American Journal of Sociology, 91, 838–873.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, G.R., & Khessina, O.M. (2004). Organizational and corporate demography. In D.L. Poston, Jr & M. Micklin (Eds.), Handbook of Population (forthcoming). Plenum/Kluwer.

    Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, G.R., & Swaminathan, A. (2000). Why the microbrewery movement? Organizational dynamics of resource partitioning in the U.S. brewing industry. American Journal of Sociology, 106, 715–762.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Carroll, G.R., Dobrev, S., & Swaminathan, A. (2002). Organizational processes of resource partitioning. Research in Organizational Behavior, 24, 1–40.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Delacroix, J., & Carroll, G.R. (1983). Organizational foundings: An ecological study of the newspaper industries of Argentina and Ireland. Administrative Science Quarterly, 28, 274–291.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Delacroix, J., Swaminathan, A., & Solt, M.E. (1989). Density dependence versus population dynamics: An ecological study of the failing in the California wine industry. American Sociological Review, 54, 245–262.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dobbin, F., & Dowd, T. (1997). How policy shapes competition: Early railroad foundings in Massachusetts. Administrative Science Quarterly, 42, 501–529.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Dobrev, S.D. (2001). Revisiting organizational legitimation: Cognitive diffusion and sociopolitical factors in the evolution of Bulgarian newspaper enterprises, 1846–1992. Organization Studies, 22, 419–444.

    Google Scholar 

  • Dobrev, S.D., Kim, T.Y., & Hannan, M.T. (2001). Dynamics of niche width and resource partitioning. American Journal of Sociology, 106, 1299–1337.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Delacroix, J., & Swaminathan, A. (1991). Cosmetic, speculative, and adaptive organizational change in the wine industry: A longitudinal study. Administrative Science Quarterly, 36, 631–661.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Fichman, M., & Levinthal, D.A. (1991). Honeymoons and the liability of adolescence: A new perspective on duration dependence in social and organizational relationships. Academy of Management Review, 16, 442–468.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Freeman, J. (1990). Ecological analysis of semiconductor firm mortality. In J.V. Singh (Ed.), Organizational Evolution: New Directions (pp. 53–77). Newbury Park, CA: Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  • Freeman, J., Carroll, G.R., & Hannan, M.T. (1983). The liability of newness: Age dependence in organizational death rates. American Sociological Review, 48, 692–710.

    Google Scholar 

  • Halliday, T.C., Powell, M.J., & Granfors, M.W. (1987). Minimalist organizations: Vital events in state bar associations, 1870–1930. American Sociological Review, 52, 456–471.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hannan, M.T. (1986). Competitive and institutional processes in organizational ecology. Technical Report 86-13, Department of Sociology, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hannan, M.T. (1986). Organizational population dynamics and social change. European Sociological Review 4, 95–109.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hannan, Michael T. (1992). Rationality and robustness in multilevel systems. In J.S. Coleman (Ed.), Rational Action in Sociology, (pp. 120–135). Newbury Park: Sage.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hannan, M.T. (1997). Inertia, density and the structure of organizational populations: Entries in European automobile industries, 1886–1981. Organization Studies, 18, 193–228.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hannan, M.T. (1998). Rethinking age dependence in organizational mortality: Logical formalizations. American Journal of Sociology, 104, 85–123.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hannan, M.T., & Carroll, G.R. (1992). Dynamics of organizational populations: Density, legitimation, and competition. New York: Oxford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hannan, M.T., Carroll, G.R., Dobrev, S.D., & Han, J. (1998). Organizational mortality in European and American automobile industries part I: Revisiting the effects of age and size. European Sociological Review, 14, 279–302.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hannan, M.T., Carroll, G.R., Dundon, E.A., & Torres, J.C. (1995). Organizational evolution in a multinational context: Entries of automobile manufacturers in Belgium, Britain, France, Germany, and Italy. American Sociological Review, 60, 509–528.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hannan, M.T., & Freeman, J. (1987). The ecology of organizational founding: American labor unions, 1836–1985. American Journal of Sociology, 92, 910–943.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hannan, M.T., & Freeman, J. (1988). The ecology of organizational mortality: American labor unions, 1836–1985. American Journal of Sociology, 94, 25–52.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Hannan, M.T., & Freeman, J. (1989). Organizational ecology. Cambridge, MA: Harvard University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Hargens, L.L. (2000). Using the literature: Reference networks, reference contexts and the social structure of scholarship. American Sociological Review, 65, 846–865.

    Google Scholar 

  • Haveman, H.A., & Cohen, L.E. (1994). The ecological dynamics of careers: The impact of organizational founding, dissolution, and merger on job mobility. American Journal of Sociology, 100, 104–152.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ingram, P., & Inman, C. (1996). Institutions, intergroup competition, and the evolution of hotel populations around Niagara Falls. Administrative Science Quarterly, 41, 629–658.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ingram, P., & Simons, T. (2000). State formation, ideological competition, and the ecology of Israeli workers cooperatives, 1920–1992. Administrative Science Quarterly, 45, 25–53.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Jaffee, J. (2000). The resource partitioning of a corporate legal market: The proliferation of specialist law firms in Silicon Valley, 1966–1997. Paper presented at American Sociological Association Meetings, Washington, DC.

    Google Scholar 

  • Jovanovic, B. (2004). The pre-producers. Paper presented at the Conference on Strategy and Ecology, Washington University, Olin School of Business, St. Louis, MO.

    Google Scholar 

  • Khessina, O.M. (2003). Entry mode, technological innovation and firm survival in the worldwide optical disk drive industry, 1983–1999. Unpublished Ph.D. Thesis, University of California, Berkeley, CA.

    Google Scholar 

  • Khessina, O.M., & Carroll, G.R. (2002). Product dynamics of de novo and de alio firms in the worldwide optical disk drive industry, 1983–1999. Paper presented at the Academy of Management Meetings, Denver, CO.

    Google Scholar 

  • Klepper, S. (2001). Employee startups in high-tech industries. Industrial and Corporate Change, 10, 639–674.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Klepper, S., & Simons, K.L. (2000). Dominance by birthright: Entry of prior radio producers and competitive ramifications in the U.S. television receiver industry. Strategic Management Journal, 21, 997–1016.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Land, K.C., Davis, W.R., & Blau, J.R. (1994). Organizing the boys of summer: The evolution of U.S. minor-league baseball, 1883–1990. American Journal of Sociology, 100, 781–813.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Lomi, A. (1995a). The population and community ecology of organizational founding: Italian cooperative bans, 1936–1989. European Sociological Review, 11, 75–98.

    Google Scholar 

  • Lomi, A. (1995b). The population and community ecology of organizational founding: Location dependence and unobserved heterogeneity. Administrative Science Quarterly 40: 111–145.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • March, J.G. (1978). Bounded rationality, ambiguity, and the engineering of choice. Bell Journal of Economics, 9, 587–608.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • March, J.G. and J.P. Olsen. (1989). Rediscovering institutions: The organizational basis of politics. New York: Free Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Marrett, C.B. (1980). Influences on the rise of new organizations: The formation of women's medical societies. Administrative Science Quarterly, 25, 185–199.

    CrossRef  PubMed  CAS  Google Scholar 

  • McKendrick, D.G., & Carroll, G.R. (2001). On the genesis of organizational forms: Evidence from the market for disk drive arrays. Organization Science, 12, 661–682.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • McKendrick, D.G., Jaffee, J., Carroll, G.R., & Khessina, O.M. (2003). In the bud? Disk array producers as a (possibly) emergent organizational form. Administrative Science Quarterly, 48, 60–93

    Google Scholar 

  • Minkoff, D.C. (1997). The sequencing of social movements. American Sociological Review, 62, 779–799.

    Google Scholar 

  • Mitchell, W. (1994). The dynamics of evolving markets: The effects of business sales and age on dissolutions and divestitures. Administrative Science Quarterly, 39, 575–602.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Olzak, S. (1989). Analysis of events in studies of collective action. Annual Review of Sociology, 15, 119–141.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Olzak, S., & West, E. (1991). Ethnic conflicts and the rise and fall of ethnic newspapers. American Sociological Review, 56, 458–474.

    Google Scholar 

  • Olzak, S., & Uhrig, N. (2001). The ecology of tactical overlap among new social movements in West Germany. American Sociological Review, 66, 694–718.

    Google Scholar 

  • Park, D.Y., & Podolny, J.M. (2000). The competitive dynamics of status and niche width: U.S. investment banking, 1920–1950. Industrial and Corporate Change, 9, 377–414.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Pfeffer, J. (1993). Barriers to the advance of organizational science: Paradigm development as a dependent variable. Academy of Management Review, 18, 599–620.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Philips, D.J. (2002). A genealogical approach to organizational life chances: The parent-progeny transfer among Silicon Valley law firms. 1946–1996. Administrative Science Quarterly, 47, 474–506.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Podolny, J.M. (1993). A status-based model of market competition. American Journal of Sociology, 98, 829–872.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Pólos, L., Hannan, M.T., & Carroll, G.R. (2002). Foundations of a theory of social forms. Industrial and Corporate Change, 11, 85–115.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Porter, M.E. (1980). Competitive strategy: Techniques for analyzing industries and competitors. New York: Free Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Rao, H. (1994). The social construction of reputation: Certification contests, legitimation, and the survival of organizations in the American automobile industry: 1895–1912. Strategic Management Journal, 15, 29–44.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ruef, M. (2000). The emergence of organizational forms: A community ecology approach. American Journal of Sociology, 106, 658–714.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ruef, M. (2002). A structural event approach to the analysis of group composition. Social Networks, 24, 135–160.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Ruef, M. (2004). Boom and bust: The effect of entrepreneurial inertia on organizational populations. Unpublished manuscript, Graduate School of Business, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA.

    Google Scholar 

  • Ruef, M., Aldrich, H.E., & Carter, N.M. (2003). The structure of founding teams: Homophily, strong ties, and isolation among U.S. entrepreneurs. American Sociological Review, 68, 195–222.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Schoonhoven, C.B., Eisenhardt, K.M., & Lyman, K. (1990). Speeding products to market: Waiting time to first product introduction in new firm. Administrative Science Quarterly, 35, 177–207.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Simons, T., & Ingram, P. (2002). Enemies of the state: Competition over the supply of order and the ecology of the kibbutz, 1910–1997. Paper presented at the 25th Anniversary of Organizational Ecology Conference, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA.

    Google Scholar 

  • Simons, T., & Ingram, P. (2004). An ecology of identity: Theory and evidence from four populations. Industrial and Corporate Change, 13, 33–60.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Singh, J.V., Tucker, D.J., & House, R.J. (1986). Organizational legitimacy and the liability of newness. Administrative Science Quarterly, 31, 171–193.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sørensen, J.B., & Sorenson, O. (2003). From conception to birth: Opportunity perception and resource mobilization in entrepreneurship. Advances in Strategic Management, 20, 89–117.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sorenson, O., & Audia, P.G. (2000). The social structure of entrepreneurial activity: Geographic concentration of footwear production in the U.S., 1940–1989. American Journal of Sociology, 106, 424–462.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Sorenson, O., & Stuart, T.E. (2001). Syndication networks and the spatial distribution of venture capital investment. American Journal of Sociology, 106, 1546–1588.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Stinchcombe, A.L. (1965). Social structure and organizations. In J.G. March (Ed.), Handbook of Organizations. Chicago: Rand McNally.

    Google Scholar 

  • Stuart, T.E., & Sorenson, O. (2003). The geography of opportunity: Spatial heterogeneity in founding rates and the performance of biotechnology firms. Research Policy, 32, 229–253.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Studer-Ellis, E.M. (1995). Springboards to mortarboards: Women's college foundings in Massachusetts, New York, and Pennsylvania. Social Forces, 73, 1051–1070.

    Google Scholar 

  • Swaminathan, A. (1995). The proliferation of specialist organizations in the American wine industry, 1941–1990. Administrative Science Quarterly, 40, 653–680.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Swaminathan, A. (1998). Entry into new market segments in mature industries: Endogenous and exogenous segmentation in the U.S. brewing industry. Strategic Management Journal, 19, 389–404.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Swaninathan, A., & Delacroix, J. (1991). Differentiation within an organizational population: Additional evidence from the wine industry. Academy of Management Journal, 34, 679–692.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Swaminathan, A., & Wade, J.B. (2001). Social movement theory and the evolution of new organizational forms. In C.B. Schoonhoven & E. Romanelli (Eds.), The Entrepreneurship Dynamic: Origins of Entrepreneurship and the Evolution of Industries (pp. 286–313). Palo Alto, CA: Stanford University Press.

    Google Scholar 

  • Swanson, A.N. (2002). Form coherence and the fates of de alio and de novo organizations in the U.S. digital computer industry: 1951–1994. Unpublished Ph.D. dissertation, Stanford University, Palo Alto, CA.

    Google Scholar 

  • Tucker, D.J., Singh, J.V., & Meinhard, A.G. (1990). Organizational form, population dynamics, and institutional change: The founding patterns of voluntary organizations. Academy of Management Journal, 33, 151–178.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • Tilly, C. (1978). From mobilization to revolution. Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley.

    Google Scholar 

  • Venkataraman, S. (1997). The distinctive domain of entrepreneurship research. Advances in Entrepreneurship, Firm Emergence and Growth, 3, 119–138.

    Google Scholar 

  • Wade, J.B., Swaminathan, A., & Saxon, M.S. (1998). Normative and resource flow consequences of local regulations in American brewing industry, 1845–1918. Administrative Science Quarterly, 43, 905–935.

    CrossRef  Google Scholar 

  • West, E. (1995). Organization building in the wake of ethnic conflict: A comparison of three ethnic groups. Social Forces, 4, 1333–1363.

    Google Scholar 

Download references

Author information

Authors and Affiliations

Authors

Editor information

Editors and Affiliations

Rights and permissions

Reprints and Permissions

Copyright information

© 2005 Springer Science+Business Media, Inc.

About this chapter

Cite this chapter

Carroll, G.R., Khessina, O.M. (2005). The Ecology of Entrepreneurship. In: Alvarez, S.A., Agarwal, R., Sorenson, O. (eds) Handbook of Entrepreneurship Research. International Handbook Series on Entrepreneurship, vol 2. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-387-23622-8_9

Download citation