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Simulating Land Use Alternatives and Their Impacts on a Desert Tortoise Population in the Mojave Desert, California

  • Jocelyn L. Aycrigg
  • Steven J. Harper
  • James D. Westervelt
Part of the Modeling Dynamic Systems book series (MDS)

Keywords

Training Intensity Military Training Mojave Desert Habitat Suitability Index Desert Tortoise 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York, Inc. 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jocelyn L. Aycrigg
  • Steven J. Harper
  • James D. Westervelt

There are no affiliations available

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