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Evidence-Based Cognitive-Behavioral and Family Therapies for Adolescent Alcohol and Other Substance Use Disorders

  • Yifrah Kaminer
  • Natasha Slesnick
Part of the Recent Developments in Alcoholism book series (RDIA, volume 17)

Keywords

Bulimia Nervosa Family Therapy Adolescent Substance Adolescent Alcohol Motivational Enhancement Therapy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic/Plenum Publishers 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yifrah Kaminer
    • 1
  • Natasha Slesnick
    • 2
  1. 1.Alcohol Research Center and Department of PsychiatryUniversity of Connecticut Health CenterFarmington
  2. 2.Department of PsychologyUniversity of New MexicoAlbuquerque

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