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From Milk to Maize

The Transition to Agriculture for Rendille and Ariaal Pastoralists
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Human Ecology and Adaptation book series (STHE, volume 1)

Keywords

Arid Land Pastoral Community Small Stock Subsistence Strategy Land Title 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic / Plenum Publishers, New York 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.United States Agency for International DevelopmentNairobiKenya

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