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Introduction

The Social, Health, and Economic Consequences of Pastoral Sedentarization in Marsabit District, Northern Kenya
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Part of the Studies in Human Ecology and Adaptation book series (STHE, volume 1)

Keywords

Female Genital Mutilation Arid Land Pastoral Community Female Education Female Circumcision 
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© Kluwer Academic / Plenum Publishers, New York 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of VictoriaVictoriaCanada
  2. 2.Department of AnthropologySmith CollegeNorthampton

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