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Female Education in a Sedentary Ariaal Rendille Community

Paternal Decision-Making and Biosocial Pathways
Chapter
Part of the Studies in Human Ecology and Adaptation book series (STHE, volume 1)

Keywords

Sexual Debut Female Education Significant Independent Variable Offspring Mortality Subsistence Pattern 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic / Plenum Publishers, New York 2005

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of VictoriaVictoriaCanada
  2. 2.Strengthening STDs/HIV Control Unit, Department of Community HealthUniversity of NairobiNairobiKenya

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