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What Can We Learn about Resilience from Large-Scale Longitudinal Studies?

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Abstract

Since the mid-1980s, a number of investigators from different disciplines—child development, pediatrics, psychology, psychiatry, and sociology—have focused on the question why some children cope successfully with major adversities in their lives, while others develop severe and persistent psychopathology. The resilience these children display is conceived as an end-product of buffering processes that do not eliminate risks and stress in their hves, but that allow the individual to deal with them effectively (Rutter, 1987).

Keywords

  • Emotional Support
  • Stressful Life Event
  • Childhood Adversity
  • Middle Childhood
  • Developmental Competence

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Werner, E.E. (2005). What Can We Learn about Resilience from Large-Scale Longitudinal Studies?. In: Goldstein, S., Brooks, R.B. (eds) Handbook of Resilience in Children. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-306-48572-9_7

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