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Understanding the Concept of Resilience

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Abstract

The deceptively simple construct of resilience is in fact rife with hidden complexities, contradictions, and ambiguities. These have been recognized in earlier reviews of the relevant literature (Kaplan, 1999). More recent reviews have reaffirmed many of these difficulties and have offered suggestions in some cases for resolution of these problems (Luthar, Cicchetti, & Becker, 2000; Olsson, Bond, Bums, Vella-Brodrick, & Sawyer, 2003). By and large, however, problematic aspects of the concept of resilience persist.

Keywords

  • Protective Factor
  • Ecological Resilience
  • Undesirable State
  • Benign Outcome
  • Family Resilience

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Kaplan, H.B. (2005). Understanding the Concept of Resilience. In: Goldstein, S., Brooks, R.B. (eds) Handbook of Resilience in Children. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-306-48572-9_3

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