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Resilience and the Child with Learning Disabilities

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Abstract

In this chapter we address how the factors of risk and resihence affect children with learning disabilities. Because learning disabilities encompass varied disorders associated primarily with difficulty learning, our central focus is upon children attending school. Both positive and negative school experiences shape children’s self-perceptions and contribute to their academic self-concepts. Unfortunately, for many children with learning disabihties, their lowered academic self-perceptions and self-concepts are influenced by difficulties in both the academic and social aspects of school (Vaughn & Elbaum, 1999). In the first part of this chapter, we discuss how self-concept and, subsequently, resilience are shaped by school experiences. In the second part, we review various ways to help children with learning disabilities increase their resiliency and preserve their self-esteem and feelings of self-worth.

Keywords

  • General Education
  • Learning Disability
  • Learn Disability
  • General Education Teacher
  • Math Disability

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Mather, N., Ofiesh, N. (2005). Resilience and the Child with Learning Disabilities. In: Goldstein, S., Brooks, R.B. (eds) Handbook of Resilience in Children. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-306-48572-9_15

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