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Families as Contexts for Children’s Adaptation

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Abstract

During the past few decades, the landscape of the family structure has changed dramatically. The United States has seen a decrease in the “traditional” family, complete with two biological parents and consisting of one parent in the workforce and the other in a caregiver role. It is now being replaced with an ever-increasing diverse family structure. The population of children living with two parents has decreased to 69% in 2002, down from 72% in 1990 and 77% in 1980 (U.S. Census Bureau, 2003). Single-parent families and stepparent families have become more common, despite the fact that children in single-parent or divorced families are at greater risk for lower academic achievement and more likely to drop out of school or bear children at an early age, as well as displaying psychological factors including depression, anxiety, stress, and aggression (Fields, Smith, Bass, & Lugaila, 2001; McLanahan & Sandefur, 1994).

Keywords

  • Parenting Style
  • Family Involvement
  • Family Unit
  • Authoritative Parenting
  • Family Schema

These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Sheridan, S.M., Eagle, J.W., Dowd, S.E. (2005). Families as Contexts for Children’s Adaptation. In: Goldstein, S., Brooks, R.B. (eds) Handbook of Resilience in Children. Springer, Boston, MA. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-306-48572-9_11

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