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Hybridization between Red-tailed Monkeys (Cercopithecus ascanius) and Blue Monkeys (C. mitis) in East African Forests

  • Kate M. Detwiler
Part of the Developments in Primatology: Progress and Prospects book series (DIPR)

Summary

Hybridization between Cercopithecus ascanius and C. mitis has been previously recorded at several localities in East Africa. However, recent sightings of redtailed and blue monkey hybrids suggest that they are restricted to Gombe National Park, Tanzania. At Gombe, hybrid monkeys of various age and sex classes are commonly sighted. They are found within red-tailed monkey groups, blue monkey groups, and mixed-species groups, suggesting that introgression is bidirectional. Observations of hybrid females nursing infants and juveniles provide evidence of female hybrid fertility. The high incidence of hybridization at Gombe calls for its recognition as a localized sympatric hybrid zone between Cercopithecus ascanius schmidti and C. mitis doggetti. Gombe—a terrestrial island habitat—then becomes of special interest to evolutionary primatologists because of its possible implications for speciation in guenons.

Keywords

Loud Call Monkey Group Blue Monkey Heterospecific Mate Cercopithecus Mitis 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2004

Authors and Affiliations

  • Kate M. Detwiler
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyNew York UniversityNew YorkUSA
  2. 2.New York Consortium in Evolutionary Primatology (NYCEP)USA

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