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Data Analysis of Time-Resolved Measurements

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Part of the Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration book series (AIPH,volume 3)

Summary

Advanced data analysis methods suitable for the analysis of kinetic spectroscopic data from complex chemical and biological systems are defined and reviewed. The aim of this chapter is on the one hand to introduce beginners dealing with complex data analysis problems into the matter. On the other hand it is intended as a relatively simple description, using only a minimum of mathematics, that should enable non-specialist readers from other fields to better understand the methods currently used to deal with complex kinetic problems. The first part introduces the basic concepts and terms by using a simple kinetic scheme as an example. The fundamentally different concepts of “mathematical data fitting” and “physical model testing” are defined and illustrated with some examples. Their capabilities and limitations are then discussed in detail. Further subsections deal with the mathematical optimization procedures, proper weighting of data points, and the importance of performing an error analysis. As a first-hand illustration to the use of these methods in current research problems somerecent applications in the field of photosynthesis research are given.

Abbreviations

  • DAS — decay-associated spectrum
  • LHI — B875 light-harvesting complex of photosynthetic bacteria
  • LHII — peripheral B800-850 light-harvesting complex of photosynthetic bacteria
  • PS — photosystem
  • RC — reaction center complex
  • SAAS — species-associated absorption spectrum
  • SAES — species-associated emission spectrum
  • SADS — species-associated absorption difference spectrum

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© 1996 Kluwer Academic Publishers

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Holzwarth, A.R. (1996). Data Analysis of Time-Resolved Measurements. In: Amesz, J., Hoff, A.J. (eds) Biophysical Techniques in Photosynthesis. Advances in Photosynthesis and Respiration, vol 3. Springer, Dordrecht. https://doi.org/10.1007/0-306-47960-5_5

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/0-306-47960-5_5

  • Publisher Name: Springer, Dordrecht

  • Print ISBN: 978-0-7923-3642-6

  • Online ISBN: 978-0-306-47960-1

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