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Affect, Meta-Affect, and Mathematical Belief Structures

  • Gerald A. Goldin
Part of the Mathematics Education Library book series (MELI, volume 31)

Abstract

Beliefs are defined here to be multiply-encoded, internal cognitive/affective configurations, to which the holder attributes truth value of some kind (e.g., empirical truth, validity, or applicability). This chapter offers some theoretical perspectives on mathematical beliefs drawn from analysis of the affective domain, especially the interplay between meta-affect and belief structures in sustaining each other in the individual.

Keywords

Mathematical Problem Belief System Mathematical Ability Belief Structure Affective Domain 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

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  • Gerald A. Goldin

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