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Digital Democracy through Electronic Petitioning

e-petitioner
  • Ann Macintosh
  • Anna Malina
  • Steve Farrell
Part of the Advances in Database Systems book series (ADBS, volume 26)

Abstract

The International Teledemocracy Centre at Napier University has designed an innovative e-democracy toolkit to support participation in the democratic decision-making process. Electronic petitioning is one of the web-based applications in the toolkit. It can be found at www.e-petitioner.org.uk and has the functionality to create petitions; to view/sign petitions; to add background information, to join discussion forum; and to submit petitions. On 14th March 2000, the Scottish Parliament agreed to allow groups and individuals to submit petitions using the e-petitioner system for a trial period. The special arrangement between the Teledemocracy Centre and the Scottish Parliament has allowed both parties to start to evaluate the use and civic impact of electronic petitioning in Scotland. The development, deployment and evaluation of e-petitioner have demonstrated how straightforward computing techniques can enhance public participation in the newly established Scottish Parliament. As well as the system being used to submit e-petitions to the Scottish Parliament, it is also hosting the first ever e-petition to the British Prime Minister at No. 10 Downing St.

Key words

electronic petitions e-petitions e-democracy digital democracy e-government 

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References

  1. Macintosh, A., Davenport, E., Malina, A. & Whyte, A.(2001); Technology Driven Inclusive Democracy. InGrönlund, åke (2001). (ed). Electronic Government: Design, applications and management (in print).Google Scholar
  2. Malina, A., Macintosh, A., and Davenport, E.; (2001)E-petitioner: a monitoring and evaluation report; Report for the Joseph Rowntree Charitable Trust; available from the International Teledemocracy Centre.Google Scholar
  3. Scottish Parliament (2000). The report of the meeting of the Public Petitions Committee on 14th March 2000 to trial Internet petitions. At URL http://www.scottish.parliament.uk/official_report/cttee/petit-00/pumop0314.htm.
  4. The Scottish Office (1998). Shaping Scotland’s Parliament. Report of the Consultative Steering Group.Google Scholar
  5. Tsagarousianou, R. Tambini, D. & Bryan C. (1998). (Eds). Cyberdemocracy: Technology, cities and civic networks. London & NY: Routledge.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 2002

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ann Macintosh
    • 1
  • Anna Malina
    • 1
  • Steve Farrell
    • 2
  1. 1.International Teldemocracy CentreNapier UniversityEdinburghUK
  2. 2.The Scottish ParliamentEdinburghUK

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