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A gang-scheduling system for ASCI blue-pacific

  • José E. Moreira
  • Hubertus Franke
  • Waiman Chan
  • Liana L. Fong
  • Morris A. Jette
  • Andy Yoo
Workshop: Distributed Computing and Metacomputing
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1593)

Abstract

The ASCI Blue-Pacific machines are large parallel systems comprised of thousands of processors. We are currently developing and testing a gangscheduling job control system for these machines that exploits space-and time-sharing in the presence of dedicated communication devices. Our initial experience with this system indicates that, though applications pay a small overhead, overall system performance as measured by average job queue and response times improves significantly. This gang-scheduling system is planned for deployment into production mode during 1999 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory.

Keywords

Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Average Execution Time Memory Footprint Kernel Extension Gang Schedule 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1999

Authors and Affiliations

  • José E. Moreira
    • 1
  • Hubertus Franke
    • 1
  • Waiman Chan
    • 1
  • Liana L. Fong
    • 1
  • Morris A. Jette
    • 2
  • Andy Yoo
    • 2
  1. 1.International Business Machines CorporationArmonkUSA
  2. 2.Lawrence Livermore National LaboratoryLivermoreUSA

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