Non-destructive depth-dependent crossover for genetic programming

  • Takuya Ito
  • Hitoshi Iba
  • Satoshi Sato
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1391)

Abstract

In our previous paper [5], a depth-dependent crossover was proposed for GP. The purpose was to solve the difficulty of the blind application of the normal crossover, i.e., building blocks are broken unexpectedly. In the depth-dependent crossover, the depth selection ratio was varied according to the depth of a node. However, the depth-dependent crossover did not work very effectively as generated programs became larger. To overcome this, we introduce a non-destructive depth-dependent crossover, in which each offspring is kept only if its fitness is better than that of its parent. We compare GP performance with the depth-dependent crossover and that with the non-destructive depth-dependent crossover to show the effectiveness of our approach. Our experimental results clarify that the non-destructive depth-dependent crossover produces smaller programs than the depth-dependent crossover.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Takuya Ito
    • 1
  • Hitoshi Iba
    • 2
  • Satoshi Sato
    • 1
  1. 1.School of Information ScienceJapan Advanced Institute of Science and TechnologyTatsunokuchi, Nomi, IshikawaJapan
  2. 2.Machine Inference SectionElectrotechnical LaboratoryTsukuba, IbaragiJapan

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