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Beginning a transition from a local to a more global point of view in model-based vehicle tracking

  • Michael Haag
  • Hans -Hellmut Nagel
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1406)

Abstract

This contribution attempts to move beyond the status where single moving objects in video image sequences are tracked separately in the scene domain, based on individually adapted approaches and parameters. Instead, we investigate which performance can be achieved by a combination of approaches based on edge element orientation and on optical flow, applied to a variety of image sequences and vehicles. Five different image sequences of traffic scenes recorded under different conditions have been evaluated. Quantitative statements are provided about the success rates of the approach after evaluating over 5.500 full video-frames, i. e. more than 3 1/2 minutes of real-world video, using one single approach and a single parameter set. Remaining tracking failures are analyzed and classified.

Keywords

Optical Flow Edge Element Object Candidate Optical Flow Field Traffic Scene 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Haag
    • 1
  • Hans -Hellmut Nagel
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Institut für Algorithmen und Kognitive SystemeFakultät für Informatik der Universität Karlsruhe (TH)KarlsruheGermany
  2. 2.Fraunhofer-Institut für Informations- und Datenverarbeitung (IITB)Germany

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