Secure group barter: Multi-party fair exchange with semi-trusted neutral parties

  • Matt Franklin
  • Gene Tsudik
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1465)

Abstract

The recent surge in popularity of e-commerce prompted a lot of The recent surge in popularity of e-commerce prompted a lot of activity in the area of electronic payments. Solutions have been developed for cash, credit card and check-based electronic transactions. Much less attention has been paid to non-monetary commerce such as barter. In this paper we discuss the notion of “secure group barter” or multi-party fair exchange. We develop a classification of types of barter schemes and present new cryptographic protocols for multi-party exchange with fairness. These protocols assume the presence of a “semi-trusted neutral party”.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    N. Asokan, V. Schoup, and M. Waidner. Optimistic fair exchange of digital signatures. Research Report RZ 2892 (# 90840), IBM Research, December 1997.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    N. Asokan, M. Schunter, and M. Waidner. Optimistic protocols for multi-party fair exchange. Research Report RZ 2892 (# 90840), IBM Research, December 1996.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    N. Asokan, M. Schunter, and M. Waidner. Optimistic protocols for fair exchange. In ACM Conference on Computer and Communication Security, April 1997.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    D. Beaver. Security, fault tolerance and communication complexity in distributed systems. Ph.D. Thesis, Harvard University, May 1990.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    M. Ben-Or, S. Goldwasser, and A. Wigderson. Completeness theorems for noncryptographic fault tolerant distributed computation. In Proceedings of ACM STOC 1988, 1988.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    M. Blum. How to exchange (secret) keys. ACM Transactions on Computer Systems, 1:175–193, 1983.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    J. Camp, M. Harkavy, J. Tygar, and B. Yee. Anonymous atomic transactions. In 2nd USENIX Workshop on Electronic Commerce, pages 123–134, November 1996.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    D. Chaum, C. Crépeau, and I. Damgård. Multiparty unconditionally secure protocols. In Proceedings of ACM STOC 1988, 1988.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    B. Chor, S. Goldwasser, S. Micali, and B. Awerbuch. Verifiable secret sharing and achieving simultaneity in the presence of faults. In IEEE Fondations of Computer Science, 1985.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    P. Feldman. A practical scheme for non-interactive verifiable secret sharing. In IEEE Fondations of Computer Science, 1987.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    M. Franklin and M. Reiter. Fair exchange with a semi-trusted third party. In ACM Conference on Computer and Communication Security, April 1997.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    O. Goldreich, S. Micali, and A. Wigderson. How to play any mental game. In Proceedings of ACM STOC 1987, 1987.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    S. Ketchpel and H. Garcia-Molina. Making trust explicit in distributed commerce transactions. In IEEE ICDCS, 1996.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    M. Luby, S. Micali, and C. Rackoff. How to simultaneously exchange a secret bit by flipping a symmetrically-biased coin. In IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, pages 11–21, November 1984.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    J. Tygar. Atomicity in electronic commerce. In ACM Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing, pages 8–26, 1996.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    U. Vazirani and V. Vazirani. Trapdoor pseudo-random number generators, with applications to protocol design. In IEEE Symposium on Foundations of Computer Science, pages 23–30, 1983.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Matt Franklin
    • 1
  • Gene Tsudik
    • 2
  1. 1.AT&T Labs ResearchFlorham Park
  2. 2.USC Information Sciences InstituteMarina del Rey

Personalised recommendations