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Reconstruction of smooth surfaces with arbitrary topology adaptive splines

  • A. J. Stoddart
  • M. Baker
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1407)

Abstract

We present a novel method for fitting a smooth G 1 continuous spline to point sets. It is based on an iterative conjugate gradient optimisation scheme. Unlike traditional tensor product based splines we can fit arbitrary topology surfaces with locally adaptive meshing. For this reason we call the surface “slime”.

Other attempts at this problem are based on tensor product splines and are therefore not locally adaptive.

Keywords

Control Point Close Point Mesh Topology Bezier Curve Spline Surface 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. J. Stoddart
    • 1
  • M. Baker
    • 1
  1. 1.Centre for Vision, Speech and Signal ProcessingUniversity of SurreyGuildfordUK

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