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Formalism and method

  • Egidio Astesiano
  • Gianna Reggio
I Invited Lectures Lectures
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1214)

Abstract

Luckily, is getting strength the view that formal methods are useful tools within the context of an overall engineering process, heavily influenced by other factors that developers of formalisms should take into account.

We argue that the impact of formalisms would much benefit from adopting the habit of systematically and carefully relating formalisms to methods and to the engineering context, at various levels of granularity. Consequently we oppose the attitude of conflating formalism and method, with the inevitable consequence of emphasizing the formalism or even just neglecting the methodological aspects.

In order to make our reflections more concrete we illustrate our viewpoint addressing one particular activity in the software development process, namely the use of formal specification techniques.

Keywords

Formal Model Software Development Formal Method Specification Language Software Development Process 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Egidio Astesiano
    • 1
  • Gianna Reggio
    • 1
  1. 1.DISI Dipartimento di Informatica e Scienze dell'InformazioneUniversità di Genova, ItalyGenovaItaly

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