The mammalian muscle spindle and its central control

  • Manuel Hulliger
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Part of the Reviews of Physiology, Biochemistry and Pharmacology book series (volume 101)

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Manuel Hulliger
    • 1
  1. 1.Brain Research InstituteUniversity of ZürichZürichSwitzerland

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