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Automated geometric reasoning: Dixon resultants, Gröbner bases, and characteristic sets

  • Deepak Kapur
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1360)

Abstract

Three different methods for automated geometry theorem proving—a generalized version of Dixon resultants, Gröbner bases and characteristic sets—are reviewed. The main focus is, however, on the use of the generalized Dixon resultant formulation for solving geometric problems and determining geometric quantities.

Keywords

Theorem Prove Subsidiary Condition Extraneous Factor Elimination Problem Geometry Theorem 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1998

Authors and Affiliations

  • Deepak Kapur
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute for Programming and Logics Department of Computer Science StateUniversity of New YorkAlbany

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