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Universal constructions for large objects

  • James H. Anderson
  • Mark Moir
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 972)

Abstract

We present lock-free and wait-free universal constructions for implementing large shared objects. Most previous universal constructions require processes to copy the entire object state, which is impractical for large objects. Previous attempts to address this problem require programmers to explicitly fragment large objects into smaller, more manageable pieces, paying particular attention to how such pieces are copied. In contrast, our constructions are designed to largely shield programmers from this fragmentation. Furthermore, for many objects, our constructions result in lower copying overhead than previous ones.

Fragmentation is achieved in our constructions through the use of load-linked, store-conditional, and validate operations on a “large” multi-word shared variable. Before presenting our constructions, we show that these operations can be efficiently implemented from similar one-word primitives.

Keywords

Large Object Space Overhead Universal Construction Shared Queue Private Copy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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    J. Anderson and M. Moir, “Universal Constructions for Multi-Object Operations”, to appear in the Proceedings of the 14th Annual ACM Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing, 1995.Google Scholar
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • James H. Anderson
    • 1
  • Mark Moir
    • 1
  1. 1.Dept. of Computer ScienceUniversity of North Carolina at Chapel HillUSA

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