The triumph and tribulation of system stabilization

  • Mohamed G. Gouda
Invited Papers
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 972)

Abstract

We give a concise outline of the theory of system stabilization. Our primary objective is to demonstrate the richness, depth, and ultimately the utility of this beautiful theory. Our secondary objective is to identify a number of problems that arise in the theory, and so highlight several research directions that can be pursued in the future. The stabilization of a system is defined as the ability of the system to converge to a closed (under execution) set of system states. We identify two forms of convergence (strong and weak) and two forms of closed sets of states (strong and weak), and so we end up with four forms of stabilization. The outlined theory is based on these four forms of stabilization.

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    M. Abadir, M. G. Gouda, “The Stabilizing Computer,” Proceedings of the International Conference on Parallel and Distributed Systems, Taiwan, pp. 90–96, 1992.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    A. Arora, M. G. Gouda, “Closure and Convergence: A Foundation for Fault-Tolerant Computing,” IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, special issue on Software Reliability, Vol. 19, No. 3, pp. 1015–1027, November 1993.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    A. Arora, M. G. Gouda, “Distributed Reset,” IEEE Transactions on Computers, Vol. 43, No. 9, pp. 1026–1038, 1994.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. 4.
    A. Arora, M. G. Gouda, G. Varghese, “Constraint Satisfaction as a Basis for Designing Nonmasking Fault-Tolerance,” in Specification of Parallel Algorithms, edited by G. E. Blelloch, K. M. Chandy, S. Jagannathan, DIMACS Series in Discrete Mathematics and Theoretical Computer Science, Vol. 18, 1994.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    A. Arora, M. G. Gouda, T. Herman “Composite Routing Protocols,” Proceedings of the Second IEEE Symposium on Parallel and Distributed Processing, December 1990.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    B. Awerbuch, R. Ostrovsky, “Memory-efficient and Self-Stabilizing Network Reset,” Proceedings of the 13th Annual ACM Symposium on Principles of Distributed Computing, 1994.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    J. Beauquier, S. Cordier, S. Delaet, “Optimum Probabilistic Self-Stabilization on Uniform Rings,” Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Self-Stabilizing Systems, Technical Report, Department of Computer Science, University of Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 1995.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    B. Bourgon, A. K. Datta, “A Self-Stabilizing Distributed Heap Maintenance Protocol,” Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Self-Stabilizing Systems, Technical Report, Department of Computer Science, University of Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 1995.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    G. M. Brown, M. G. Gouda, C. L. Wu, “Token Systems that Self-Stabilize,” IEEE Transactions on Computers, Vol. 38, No. 6, pp. 845–852, June 1989.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    J. E. Burns, M. G. Gouda, R. E. Miller, “On Relaxing Interleaving Assumptions,” Proceedings of the MCC Workshop on Self-Stabilization, Austin, Texas, 1989.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    J. E. Burns, M. G. Gouda, R. E. Miller, “Stabilization and Pseudostabilization,” Distributed Computing, special issue on Self-Stabilization, Vol. 7, No. 1, pp. 35–42, November 1993.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    J. Couvreur, M. G. Gouda, N. Francez, “Asynchronous Unison,” Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Distributed Computing Systems, Tokyo, pp. 486–493, 1992.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    E. W. Dijkstra, “Self-Stabilizing Systems in Spite of Distributed Control,” Communications of the ACM, Vol. 17, No. 11, pp. 643–644, 1974.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    S. Dolev, T. Herman, “SuperStabilizing Protocols for Dynamic Distributed Systems,” Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Self-Stabilizing Systems, Technical Report, Department of Computer Science, University of Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 1995.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    S. Dolev, J. Welch, “Self-Stabilizing Clock Synchronization in the Presence of Byzantine Faults,” Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Self-Stabilizing Systems, Technical Report, Department of Computer Science, University of Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 1995.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    M. Evangelist, M. G. Gouda, “Convergence/Response Tradeoffs in Concurrent Systems,” Proceedings of the Second IEEE Symposium on Parallel and Distributed Processing, December 1990.Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    S. Ghosh, A. Gupta, M. H. Karaata, S. V. Pemmaraju “Self-Stabilizing Dynamic Programming Algorithms on Trees,” Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Self-Stabilizing Systems, Technical Report, Department of Computer Science, University of Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 1995.Google Scholar
  18. 18.
    M. G. Gouda, “Stabilizing Observers”, Information Processing Letters, Vol. 57, pp. 99–103, 1994.CrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  19. 19.
    M. G. Gouda, T. Herman, “Adaptive Programming,” IEEE Transactions on Software Engineering, Vol. 17, No. 9, pp. 911–921, September 1991.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. 20.
    M. G. Gouda, R. R. Howell, L. E. Rosier, “The Instability of Self-Stabilization,” Acta Informatica, Vol. 27, pp. 697–724, 1990.CrossRefMathSciNetGoogle Scholar
  21. 21.
    M. G. Gouda, N. Multari, “Stabilizing Communication Protocols,” IEEE Transactions on Computing, special issue on Protocol Engineering, Vol. 40, No. 4, pp. 448–458, April 1991.Google Scholar
  22. 22.
    M. G. Gouda, M. Schneider, “Maximum Flow Routing,” Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Self-Stabilizing Systems, Technical Report, Department of Computer Science, University of Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 1995.Google Scholar
  23. 23.
    C. Johnen, J. Beauquier, “Space-Efficient Distributed Self-Stabilizing Depth-First Token Circulation,” Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Self-Stabilizing Systems, Technical Report, Department of Computer Science, University of Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 1995.Google Scholar
  24. 24.
    S. Katz, K. J. Perry, “Self-Stabilizing Extensions for Message-Passing Systems,” Distributed Computing, Vol. 7, pp. 17–26, 1993.Google Scholar
  25. 25.
    C. Lin, J. Simon, “Possibility and Impossibility Results for Self-Stabilizing Phase Clocks on Synchronous Rings,” Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Self-Stabilizing Systems, Technical Report, Department of Computer Science, University of Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 1995.Google Scholar
  26. 26.
    M. Schneider, “Self-Stabilization,” ACM Computing Surveys, Vol. 25, No. 1, March 1993.Google Scholar
  27. 27.
    S. K. Shukla, D. J. Rosenkrantz, S. S. Ravi, “Observations on Self-Stabilizing Graph Algorithms for Anonymous Networks,” Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Self-Stabilizing Systems, Technical Report, Department of Computer Science, University of Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 1995.Google Scholar
  28. 28.
    J. Spinelli, R. G. Gallager, “Event Driven Topology Without Sequence Numbers,” IEEE Transactions on Communications, Vol. 37, No. 5, pp. 468–474, 1989.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. 29.
    M. S. Tsai, S. T. Huang, “Self-Stabilizing Ring Orientation Protocols,” Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Self-Stabilizing Systems, Technical Report, Department of Computer Science, University of Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 1995.Google Scholar
  30. 30.
    I. Yen, F. B. Bastani, “A Highly Safe Self-Stabilizing Mutual Exclusion Algorithm,” Proceedings of the Second Workshop on Self-Stabilizing Systems, Technical Report, Department of Computer Science, University of Las Vegas, Las Vegas, Nevada, May 1995.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mohamed G. Gouda
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer SciencesUniversity of Texas at AustinAustin

Personalised recommendations