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A five year perspective on software engineering graduate programs at George Mason University

  • Paul Ammann
  • Hassan Gomaa
  • Jeff Offutt
  • David Rine
  • Bo Sanden
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 750)

Abstract

This paper describes the experience obtained at George Mason University while developing a Master of Science program in software engineering. To date, the program has graduated over 45 students, with a current production rate of 10 to 15 a year. The paper also describes experience with a certificate program in software engineering, which is a software engineering specialization taken by Masters students in related disciplines, and the software engineering specialization within the PhD program in Information Technology. We discuss our courses, students, the successes that we have had, and the problems that we have faced.

Keywords

Software Engineering Software Engineer Software Project Certificate Program Software Requirement 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Ammann
    • 1
  • Hassan Gomaa
    • 1
  • Jeff Offutt
    • 1
  • David Rine
    • 1
  • Bo Sanden
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Information and Software Systems EngineeringGeorge Mason UniversityFairfax

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