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Control synthesis for a class of hybrid systems subject to configuration-based safety constraints

  • Michael Heymann
  • Feng Lin
  • George Meyer
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1201)

Abstract

We examine a class of hybrid systems called Composite Hybrid Machines (CHMs), that consist of the concurrent (and partially synchronized) operation of Elementary Hybrid Machines (EHMs). Legal behavior is specified by a set of illegal configurations that the CHM may not enter, and is to be achieved by the concurrent operation of the CHM with a suitably designed legal controller. A legal controller is minimally restrictive if, when composed to operate concurrently with another legal controller, it will never interfere with the operation of the other controller. We focus attention on the problem of synthesizing a minimally restrictive legal controller, whenever a legal controller exists. We present an algorithm for the synthesis of minimally restrictive legal controllers for CHMs with rate-limited dynamics, where legal guards are conjunctions or disjunctions of atomic formulas in the dynamic variables (of the type x ≤ x0 or x ≥ x0).

We demonstrate our approach by synthesizing a minimally restrictive controller for a steam boiler (the verification of which recently received a great deal of attention).

Keywords

Hybrid System Dynamic Transition Shared Variable Atomic Formula Hybrid Automaton 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag Berlin Heidelberg 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Michael Heymann
    • 1
  • Feng Lin
    • 2
  • George Meyer
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceTechnion, Israel Institute of TechnologyHaifaIsrael
  2. 2.Department of Electrical and Computer EngineeringWayne State UniversityDetroit
  3. 3.NASA Ames Research CenterMoffett Field

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