Mining sequential patterns: Generalizations and performance improvements

  • Ramakrishnan Srikant
  • Rakesh Agrawal
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1057)

Abstract

The problem of mining sequential patterns was recently introduced in [3]. We are given a database of sequences, where each sequence is a list of transactions ordered by transaction-time, and each transaction is a set of items. The problem is to discover all sequential patterns with a user-specified minimum support, where the support of a pattern is the number of data-sequences that contain the pattern. An example of a sequential pattern is“5% of customers bought ‘Foundation’ and ‘Ringworld’ in one transaction, followed by ‘Second Foundation’ in a later transaction”. We generalize the problem as follows. First, we add time constraints that specify a minimum and/or maximum time period between adjacent elements in a pattern. Second, we relax the restriction that the items in an element of a sequential pattern must come from the same transaction, instead allowing the items to be present in a set of transactions whose transaction-times are within a user-specified time window. Third, given a user-defined taxonomy (is-a hierarchy) on items, we allow sequential patterns to include items across all levels of the taxonomy.

We present GSP, a new algorithm that discovers these generalized sequential patterns. Empirical evaluation using synthetic and real-life data indicates that GSP is much faster than the AprioriAll algorithm presented in [3]. GSP scales linearly with the number of data-sequences, and has very good scale-up properties with respect to the average data-sequence size.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ramakrishnan Srikant
    • 1
    • 2
  • Rakesh Agrawal
    • 1
  1. 1.IBM Almaden Research CenterSan Jose
  2. 2.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of WisconsinMadison

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