The Cogito development system

  • Owen Traynor
  • Dan Hazel
  • Peter Kearney
  • Andrew Martin
  • Ray Nickson
  • Luke Wildman
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes in Computer Science book series (LNCS, volume 1349)

Abstract

The Cogito system provides comprehensive support for the development of specifications written in the Sum language (a modular extension of Z). The tool-set provides technology to aid in the construction, analysis and development of Sum specifications. Ada code is the final result of a development in Cogito.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1997

Authors and Affiliations

  • Owen Traynor
    • 1
  • Dan Hazel
    • 1
  • Peter Kearney
    • 1
  • Andrew Martin
    • 1
  • Ray Nickson
    • 1
  • Luke Wildman
    • 1
  1. 1.Software Verification Research Centre, School of Information TechnologyThe University of QueenslandNew Zeland

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