Playful User Interfaces pp 253-274

Part of the Gaming Media and Social Effects book series (GMSE)

Designing Games to Discourage Sedentary Behaviour

  • Regan L. Mandryk
  • Kathrin M. Gerling
  • Kevin G. Stanley
Chapter

Abstract

Regular physical activity has many physical, cognitive and emotional benefits. Health researchers have shown that there are also risks to too much sedentary behaviour, regardless of a person’s level of physical activity, and there are now anti-sedentary guidelines alongside the guidelines for physical activity. Exergames (games that require physical exertion) have been successful at encouraging physical activity through fun and engaging gameplay; however, an individual can be both physically active (e.g. by going for a jog in the morning) and sedentary (e.g. by sitting at a computer for the rest of the day). In this chapter, we analyse existing exertion games through the lens of the anti-sedentary guidelines to determine which types of games also meet the requirements for anti-sedentary game design. We review our own game designs in this space and conclude with an identification of design opportunities and research challenges for the new area of anti-sedentary game design.

Keywords

Energames Exergames Sedentary behaviour Cognitive benefits Exercise Games 

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Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2014

Authors and Affiliations

  • Regan L. Mandryk
    • 1
  • Kathrin M. Gerling
    • 1
  • Kevin G. Stanley
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Computer ScienceUniversity of SaskatchewanSaskatoonCanada

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