Advertisement

Recycle-Based Organic Agriculture in Japan and the World

  • Yosei OikawaEmail author
  • Vicheka Lorn
  • J. Indro Surono
  • Y. P. Sudaryanto
  • Dian Askhabul Yamin
  • Tineke Mandang
  • Seishu Tojo
Chapter

Abstract

In the first section, possibilities and challenges in project-type organic agriculture in Central Vietnam are examined. Findings and lessons learned from promoting organic agriculture in buffer zone villages of Bach Ma National Park are evaluated. The project team proposes that the multipurpose use of charcoal is an appropriate technology to be applied in this area. The objective is to improve their livelihood through the use of charcoal in both agricultural industry and livestock husbandry. Another project is creating organic vegetable supply chain in Hue City. This project aims to spread biogas digesters using livestock manure and organic vegetable cultivation using biogas residue.

In the second section, a corporate-type organic agriculture in Indonesia is introduced. This foundation has the cooperating farmers around the estate and cultivates more than 70 kinds of vegetable and horticultural crops all year round. They employ mechanical soil conservation techniques such as making bench terraces with beds following the soil contour or cutting slopes or perpendicular sides combined with vegetative techniques by planting grass or other plants to reinforce terraces. To disseminate this organic agriculture, the foundation regularly organizes organic farming training sessions and workshops, which are attended by various stakeholders such as students, farmers, practitioners, and other professionals to transfer knowledge from the experts to the participants.

In the third section, an emergent-type local organic agriculture in Japan is explained. A biogas plant established and operated by a nonprofitable organization (NPO) is producing digested slurry and supplying it to the farming fields as organic fertilizer. The NPO provides detailed recipes for the use of digested slurry in the paddy and vegetable fields. Among the 397 commercial farmers in Ogawamachi, 33 engage in organic agriculture. These organic farmers are associated with the trainees working at a leading farm. After the training period, some trainees become new farmers and lead local groups to engage in organic farming.

References

  1. BAJ: Bridge Asia Japan (2012) Biogas digester promotion project for small scale farmers in Hue City, Vietnam. Japan Fund for Global Environment, FY 2011 Activity Reports (in Japanese). https://www.erca.go.jp/jfge/subsidy/organization/act_repo/report23/055.html. Accessed 10 May 2019
  2. BAJ: Bridge Asia Japan (2013) Biogas digester promotion project for small scale farmers in Hue City, Vietnam. Japan Fund for Global Environment, FY 2012 Activity Reports (in Japanese). https://www.erca.go.jp/jfge/subsidy/organization/act_repo/report24/pdf/04_057.pdf. Accessed 10 May 2019
  3. BAJ: Bridge Asia Japan (2014) Biogas digester promotion project for small scale farmers in Hue City, Vietnam. Japan Fund for Global Environment, FY 2013 Activity Reports (in Japanese). https://www.erca.go.jp/jfge/subsidy/organization/act_repo/report25/pdf/04_085.pdf. Accessed 10 May 2019
  4. BAJ: Bridge Asia Japan (2017) The project for technology training of organic vegetable cultivation and strengthening of farmer organization in Hue, Vietnam. Asian Co-operative Cooperation Fund, Activity Report 2017, p. 24 (in Japanese). http://ccij.jp/book/pdf/etc20170614_01_01.pdf. Accessed 10 May 2019
  5. BAJ: Bridge Asia Japan (2018) The project for technology training of organic vegetable cultivation and strengthening of farmer organization in Hue, Vietnam. Asian Co-operative Cooperation Fund, Activity Report 2018, p. 19 (in Japanese). http://ccij.jp/book/pdf/etc20180611_01_01.pdf. Accessed 10 May 2019
  6. BAJ: Bridge Asia Japan (n.d.) Bridge Asia Japan Website (in Japanese). https://www.baj-npo.org/. Accessed 10 May 2019
  7. Furukawa Y, Hasegawa H (2006) Response of Spinach and Komatsuna to biogas effluent made from source-separated kitchen garbage. J Environ Qual 35(5):1939–1947CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Glaser B, Lehman J, Zech W (2002) Ameliorating physical and chemical properties of highly weathered soils in the tropics with charcoal – a review. Biol Fertil Soils 35:219–230.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s00374-002-0466-4 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Hoi An Tourism (n.d.) Tra Que Vegetable Village. http://hoian-tourism.com/the-heritage/hoi_an_traditional_occupations/tra-que-vegetable-village. Accessed 10 May 2019
  10. Iizuka R (2009) The entry process into agriculture and the view of life of organic farming woman – a case study on Ogawa-machi. J Rural Life Soc Japan 52(2):12–21Google Scholar
  11. Kobayashi K (2016) Development of monitoring methane fermentation using three dimensional fluorescent analysis. MS thesis, Tokyo University of Agriculture and technology (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  12. Lehmann J, Joseph S (eds) (2009) Biochar for environmental management: science and technology. Earthscan, LondonGoogle Scholar
  13. Lehmann J, Joseph S (eds) (2015) Biochar for environmental management: science, technology and implementation, 2nd edn. London/New York, RoutledgeGoogle Scholar
  14. Lorn V, Tanaka H, Bellingrath-Kimura SD, Oikawa Y (2017) The effects of biochar from rice husk and Chromolaena odorata on soil properties and tomato growth in Cambodia. Trop Agric Dev 61(3):99–106.  https://doi.org/10.11248/jsta.61.99 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. McGreevy SR, Shibata A (2010) A rural revitalization scheme in Japan utilizing biochar and eco-branding: the carbon minus project, Kameoka City. Annals Environ Sci 4:11–22. http://hdl.handle.net/2047/d20000347 Google Scholar
  16. Miho Y, Tojo S, Watanabe K (2004) Utilization in cultivation and its environmental load of digested slurry from biogas plant. J Jpn Soc Agric Machinery 66(3):77–83. (in Japanese)Google Scholar
  17. Möller K, Müller T (2012) Effects of anaerobic digestion on digestate nutrient availability and crop growth: a review. Eng Life Sci 12(3):242–257CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Nguyen VCN (2011) Small-scale anaerobic digesters in Vietnam: development and challenges. J Vietnam Environ 1(1):12–18. https://openjournals.neu.edu/aes/journal/article/download/v4art2/v4p11-22/ Google Scholar
  19. Oguchi K (2012) Establishment of the regional relationship and the development of organic agriculture: a case study of Saitama Prefecture Hiki Country Ogawa Town. J Rural Stud 18(2):36–43CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Oikawa Y, Phan QD, Phan VBD, Nguyen VL, Yamada M, Hayashidani H, Tanaka H, Tarao M, Katsura K (2018) Charcoal application farming with livestock for small scale farmers in Central Viet Nam. In: Agroecology for food security and nutrition, proceedings of the international symposium on agroecology in China FAO, Rome, pp 197–210. http://www.fao.org/3/CA0153EN/ca0153en.pdf
  21. Orito E (2014) Teikei as “morotomo” relationship embedded in agrarian rationality: the experience of the “Orei-sei” system at Shimosato farm. J Environ Sociol 20:133–148CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Sahlström L (2003) A review of survival of pathogenic bacteria in organic waste used in biogas plants. Bioresour Technol 87(2):161–166CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  23. Steiner C, Teixeira WG, Lehmann J, Nehls T, JLVd M, Blum WEH, Zech W (2007) Long term effects of manure, charcoal and mineral fertilization on crop production and fertility on a highly weathered Central Amazonian upland soil. Plant Soil 291:275–290.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11104-007-9193-9 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  24. Yamada M, Kawabata Y, Oikawa Y (2014) Research, education and extension of environmental technologies in developing countries: case study of Tokyo University of Agriculture and Technology. J Arid Land Stud 23(4):185–191. http://nodaiweb.university.jp/desert/pdf_APCSEET2013/185-191_Yamada%20et%20al%20rev.pdf Google Scholar
  25. Yamada R (2008) Diagnosis, design and evaluation of diversified farming in the Mekong Delta of Vietnam: based on the farming systems research approach. Norin-tokei-kyokai, Tokyo (in Japanese)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yosei Oikawa
    • 1
    Email author
  • Vicheka Lorn
    • 2
  • J. Indro Surono
    • 3
  • Y. P. Sudaryanto
    • 3
  • Dian Askhabul Yamin
    • 3
  • Tineke Mandang
    • 4
  • Seishu Tojo
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of AgricultureTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyFuchuJapan
  2. 2.United Graduate School of Agricultural ScienceTokyo University of Agriculture and TechnologyFuchuJapan
  3. 3.Bina Sarana Bakti (BSB) FoundationBogorIndonesia
  4. 4.Bogor Agricultural UniversityBogorIndonesia

Personalised recommendations