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Prevention, Diagnosis, and Treatment of TB in the Migrating Population

  • Shou-jiang Liu
  • Wei Wei
Chapter

Abstract

TB is a chronic infectious disease caused by Mtb. According to the literature reports, all human tissues and organs other than human hair can be infected by Mtb to cause TB. However, lungs are the most commonly affected organ by Mtb to cause pulmonary TB. According to statistics, the cases of pulmonary TB account for 80–85% of all the cases of TB.

According to the Law of P. R. China on Infectious Diseases Control, TB is a class B infectious disease. It mainly spreads via respiratory tract and the source of infection is mainly patients excreting Mtb, especially untreated patients excreting Mtb with no subjective symptoms or slight symptoms. The patients excreting Mtb spread droplets with Mtb into the air via coughing, sneezing, laughing, or talking. The air-borne droplets and dusts containing Mtb thus cause interpersonal spread of TB. Other rare spreading routes of TB include gastrointestinal tract and mother-to-infant spread.

Migrating population has profound impact on the epidemic of TB worldwide. The flow of population is a common but complicated social phenomenon. TB mainly spreads from person to person via air-borne droplets and dusts, and thus its spreading has no boundary. Along with the flow of population, TB can be spread from one person to another and from one region to another region. In addition to its high mobility, flowing population commonly leads a marginalized life and/or is subject to major change of their lifestyle. These factors cause their immunity to be compromised, which further triggers the incubated TB to develop into active TB. In addition, poverty, crowded housing, inappropriate treatment, high-risk working conditions, and other high-risk factors such as drug abuse and alcoholism may also cause progression and spread of TB.

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Copyright information

© People's Medical Publishing House, PR of China 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Shou-jiang Liu
    • 1
  • Wei Wei
    • 1
  1. 1.Shenzhen Nanshan Center for Chronic Disease ControlShenzhenChina

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