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Early Identification of Psychiatric Disorders

  • Tae Young Lee
  • Minah Kim
  • Jun Soo KwonEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Advances in Experimental Medicine and Biology book series (AEMB, volume 1192)

Abstract

Early detection and early intervention approach targets people at-risk stages who are very close to conversion to illness, or patients who have just transited the illness stage and have not, yet, become chronic. Rigorous efforts have been put in for early detection and early intervention in psychiatry. A high-risk population is identified by clinical manifestations that, as per their severity and suffering, do not yet meet the diagnostic criteria of psychiatric disorders. There have been attempts to break through the existing phenotype-based diagnostic system using biomarkers, but researchers have yet to overcome the heterogeneity of the disease. Nowadays, the clinical staging models in psychosis, bipolar, and depressive disorders have been proposed as a heuristic and a practical alternative to this. This model is evolving to integrate various demographic factors, clinical symptoms, cognitive functions, and biomarkers.

Keywords

Early identification Heterogeneity Clinical staging Biomarkers Psychiatric disorders 

Notes

Acknowledgements

This research was supported by Basic Science Research Program through the National Research Foundation of Korea (NRF) funded by the Ministry of Science, ICT and Future Planning (Grant no. 2019R1A2B5B03100844).

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© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of PsychiatrySeoul National University College of MedicineSeoulRepublic of Korea

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