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All Work and Play

  • Paul Ross
Chapter

Abstract

Foreign employees in Chinese firms tend to dismiss the myriad events and activities that are fixtures of the Chinese workplace as frivolous, sophomoric, and even demeaning. In so doing, they misunderstand the significance of the role these activities play and underestimate how integral they are to a foreign employee’s ability to adapt to company culture and successfully integrate themselves into company’s daily operations. As quirky, impromptu, and disorderly as they may appear, corporate activities in a Chinese company are not just organized ‘for the fun of it’. They adhere to a set of conventions that situate them within a much larger system of political, social, cultural values and beliefs as well as play a central role in shaping corporate culture and transmitting the essence of that culture to the company’s employees, including those who represent the company’s operations overseas.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Paul Ross
    • 1
  1. 1.Boynton BeachUSA

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