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An Evaluation of Hydrological Modeling Using SCS-CN Method in Ungauged Om Chhu River Basin of Phuentsholing, Bhutan

  • Leki Dorji
  • Raju SarkarEmail author
  • Ugyen Lhachey
  • Vasker Sharma
  • Tshewang
  • Abhirup Dikshit
  • Ritesh Kurar
Conference paper
Part of the Disaster Risk Reduction book series (DRR)

Abstract

Rainfall and runoff are essential components which contribute immensely to hydrological cycle and design of hydrological structures. The challenges associated with hydrology are prediction and quantification of catchment surface runoff. The runoff curve number (CN) is an essential factor in determining flow in Soil Conservation Service (SCS)-based hydrological modeling method. Estimation of direct rainfall-runoff is always efficient but is not possible for most of the location in desired time. Use of remote sensing and GIS technology can be useful to overcome the problem in conventional methods for estimating runoff. Hydrological databases are the rare information assets especially for a country like Bhutan where sparse or no gauging station has been installed, thereby leaving most of the basins ungauged. It has been a challenge for city planners and municipals to go on with the decisions of stormwater management works. The study aims to estimate the surface runoff from the ungauged Om Chhu river basin which is situated in Phuentsholing, Bhutan, using SCS-CN method. This paper demonstrates that integration of GIS with the SCS-CN method provides a useful tool for estimating runoff volumes in Om Chhu river basin.

Keyword

Rainfall-runoff modeling SCS-CN method HEC-HMS ArcGIS Interpolation 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Leki Dorji
    • 1
  • Raju Sarkar
    • 1
    • 2
    Email author
  • Ugyen Lhachey
    • 1
  • Vasker Sharma
    • 1
  • Tshewang
    • 1
  • Abhirup Dikshit
    • 1
  • Ritesh Kurar
    • 1
  1. 1.Center for Disaster Risk Reduction and Community Development StudiesCollege of Science and Technology, Royal University of BhutanPhuentsholingBhutan
  2. 2.Department of Civil EngineeringDelhi Technological UniversityNew DelhiIndia

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