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The Historical Gene of China: A Unified Multi-ethnic State

  • Shiyuan HaoEmail author
Chapter
Part of the China Insights book series (CHINAIN)

Abstract

The thinker Gong Zizhen in Qing dynasty said, “If you wish to know the Great Way, you must first know history; conversely, to annihilate a country, you must first remove its history.” Our perspective of history shapes the way in which we view the present, and therefore, it dictates what answers we offer for existing problems. As we study the history of a country, we will learn about the challenges and achievements of its people in different historical periods. China has been a unified multi-ethnic state since ancient times, which can be defined as the historical gene of the Chinese nation. Therefore, understanding the formation of China into a multi-ethnic state is a prerequisite to the solution to its ethno-national issues.

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Copyright information

© China Social Sciences Press 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Chinese Academy of Social SciencesBeijingChina

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