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Experimental Investigation on the Forming of AA 5052-H32 Sheet Using a Rigid-Body-Based Impact in a Shock Tube

  • S. K. Barik
  • R. Ganesh NarayananEmail author
  • N. Sahoo
Conference paper
Part of the Lecture Notes on Multidisciplinary Industrial Engineering book series (LNMUINEN)

Abstract

In the present study, a high-velocity sheet-forming experiment has been performed by using a hemispherical end nylon striker inside a shock tube. The striker attains a high velocity after its interaction with the shock wave inside the shock tube and impacts the sheet metal mounted at the end flange which tries to deform it at a high velocity. Three different velocity conditions have been attempted to track the progress in sheet metal forming. The formability of the material at different velocities is measured by the various parameters such as bulge height, effective strain distribution and the limit of strain at the necking region. A comparative analysis has been performed with a quasi-static punch stretching experiment to analyse the effectiveness of the high-velocity forming. From the results, it is observed that the sheet is deformed uniformly without strain localization and the limiting strains are increased by 50–60% after the high-velocity forming.

Keywords

High-velocity forming Shock tube Striker Inertial effect Limiting strain 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Department of Mechanical EngineeringIndian Institute of Technology GuwahatiGuwahatIndia

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