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Perspectivizing World Literature (in Translation)

  • Marko JuvanEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Canon and World Literature book series (CAWOLI)

Abstract

The materialist-systemic interpretation of world literature, with its center/periphery antagonism, has been criticized for reinforcing the centrality of Western geoculture, whereas liberal-cosmopolitan approaches have been accused of reproducing Western-centrism by imposing Eurochronology, the aesthetic mode of reading, and English as the privileged language of translation. Perspectivism has arisen as an alternative to the centric model of world literature. In its commitment to defy literary inequality, however, perspectivism does not account for the economic, political, and linguistic-cultural overdetermination of the global interliterary exchange within the world translation system. Although literary innovation is by no means limited to centers, the pressures of the literary world-system condition, select, and channel its global circulation. Modernist poetry of Srečko Kosovel (1904–1926) and its translations are a case in point.

Keywords

Literary world-system World translation system Perspectivism Literary innovation 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research Center of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and ArtsLjubljanaSlovenia

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