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The Canonicity of World Literature and National Poets

  • Marko JuvanEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Canon and World Literature book series (CAWOLI)

Abstract

In the nineteenth century, national poets were invented to represent their respective communities to the Other symbolized by canonicity of world literature. Through “worlding,” national communities imagined their iconic poets as universal. Epitomizing Pan-European nationalization of literary discourse, Slovenians and Icelanders canonized their respective national poets France Prešeren (1800–1849) and Jónas Hallgrímsson (1807–1845) to counter dependency and peripherality of their emerging literatures. In the international arena, national poets were believed to demonstrate that a particular nation—especially if stateless—resembles the established nations and meets universal aesthetic standards of the world canon. These poets themselves initiated their worlding by rendering the topics of national importance in the aesthetic codes they transferred from the core literary systems of modern Europe.

Keywords

National poet Canonization World literature Peripherality 

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Research Center of the Slovenian Academy of Sciences and ArtsLjubljanaSlovenia

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