Advertisement

Environmental Impact and Ecotoxicological Influence of Biofabricated and Inorganic Nanoparticle on Soil Activity

  • Charles Oluwaseun AdetunjiEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

The application of nanoparticles of biological origin has been acknowledged and drawn the attention of several scientists in various sectors. This is premised on their various unique features that include high efficiency, stability, and their wide application in various fields most especially in agriculture and agro-allied industries which specialize in the production of agro-pesticides. Inorganic nanoparticles, most especially from metal and metal oxide, possess a more toxic potential and pose risks to human health when compared to the biofabricated nanoparticle on various soil activities. The effect of soil properties on varying levels of toxicity induced by nanoparticle toxicity is still unknown, and therefore it becomes imperative to determine the ecotoxicity and the impact of nanoparticles on soil activity after application. This review intends to report the nontargeted effect of bioengineered nanoparticle on microbial diversity, soil carbon and soil enzymes, physicochemical properties, nutrient, and bioavailability for sustainable healthy planet and provision of safe food.

Keywords

Nanoparticles Metal oxide Biofabricated nanoparticle Ecotoxicology Bioengineered 

References

  1. Adetunji CO, Sarin NB (2017) Impacts of biogenic nanoparticle on the biological control of plant pathogens. Adv Biotechnol Microbiol 7(3):555711.  https://doi.org/10.19080/AIBM.2017.07.55571CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  2. Arora S, Sharma P, Kumar S, Nayan R, Khanna PK, Zaidi MGH (2012) Gold-nanoparticle induced enhancement in growth and seed yield of Brassica juncea. Plant Growth Regul 66(3):303–310CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Cao C, Huang J, Cai WS, Yan CN, Liu JL, Jiang YD (2017) Effects of silver nanoparticles on soil enzyme activity of different wetland plant soil systems. Soil Sediment Contam Int J 26(5):558–567.  https://doi.org/10.1080/15320383.2017.1363158CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Chung H, Son Y, Yoon TK, Kim S, Kim W (2011) The effect of multi-walled carbon nanotubes on soil microbial activity. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 74:569–575CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Chunjaturas W, Ferguson JA, Rattanapichai W, Sadowsky MJ, Sajjaphan K (2014) Shift of bacterial community structure in two Thai soil series affected by silver nanoparticles using ARISA. World J Microbiol Biotechnol 30(7):2119–2124CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  6. Concha-Guerrero SI, Souza Brito EM, Piñón-Castillo HA, Tarango-Rivero SH, Caretta CA, Luna-Velasco A, Duran R, Orrantia-Borunda E (2014) Effect of CuO nanoparticles over isolated bacterial strains from agricultural soil. J Nanomater 2014., Article ID 148743, 13 pages.  https://doi.org/10.1155/2014/148743CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  7. Cornelis G, Doolette C, Thomas M, McLaughlin MJ, Kirby JK, Beak DG, Chittleborough D (2011) Retention and dissolution of engineered silver nanoparticles in natural soils. Soil Sci Soc Am J 76:891–902.  https://doi.org/10.2136/sssaj2011.0360CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Cullen LG, Tilston EL, Mitchell GR, Collins CD, Shaw LJ (2011) Assessing the impact of nano- and micro-scale zerovalent iron particles on soil microbial activities: particle reactivity interferes with assay conditions and interpretation of genuine microbial effects. Chemosphere 82:1675–1682CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Du W, Sun Y, Ji R, Zhu J, Wu J, Guo H (2011) TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles negatively affect wheat growth and soil enzyme activities in agricultural soil. J Environ Monit 3(4):822–828CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  10. Frenk S, Ben-Moshe T, Dror I, Berkowitz B, Minz D (2013) Effect of metal oxide nanoparticles on microbial community structure and function in two different soil types. PLoS One 8(12):e84441.  https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0084441CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  11. Gaddam DP, Devamma N, Tollamadugu PNVKV (2015) Evaluation of the effect of indigenous mycogenic silver nanoparticles on soil exo-enzymes in barite mine contaminated soils. Appl Nanosci 5:505–513.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s13204-014-0343-0CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. Gajjar P, Pettee B, Britt DW, Huang W, Johnson WP, Anderson AJ (2009) Antimicrobial activities of commercial nanoparticles against an environmental soil microbe, Pseudomonas putida KT2440. J Biol Eng 3:9CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  13. Ge Y, Schimel JP, Holden PA (2011) Evidence for negative effects of TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles on soil bacterial communities. Environ Sci Technol 45(4):1659–1664.  https://doi.org/10.1021/es103040tCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. Ge Y, Schimel JP, Holdena PA (2012) Identification of soil Bacteria susceptible to TiO2 and ZnO nanoparticles. Appl Environ Microbiol 78(18):6749–6758CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  15. Ghormade V, Deshpande MV, Paknikar KM (2011) Perspectives for nano-biotechnology enabled protection and nutrition of plants. Biotechnol Adv 29:792–803CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  16. Hänsch M, Emmerling C (2010) Effects of silver nanoparticles on the microbiota and enzyme activity in soil. J Plant Nutr Soil Sci 173:554–558CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Hawthorne J, Musante C, Sinha SK, White JC (2012) Accumulation and phytotoxicity of engineered nanoparticles to Cucurbita Pepo. Int J Phytoremediation 14(4):429–442.  https://doi.org/10.1080/15226514.2011.620903CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Hong F, Zhou J, Liu C, Yang F, Wu C, Zheng L, Yang P (2005) Effect of nano-TiO2 on photochemical reaction of chloroplasts of spinach. Biol Trace Elem Res 105(1–3):269–279CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  19. Kim S, Kim J, Lee I (2011) Effects of Zn and ZnO nanoparticles and Zn2+ on soil enzyme activity and bioaccumulation of Zn in Cucumis sativus. Chem Ecol 27:49–55CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Klingenfuss F (2014) Testing of TiO2 nanoparticles on wheat and microorganisms in a soil microcosm. MSc Thesis, pp 1–62Google Scholar
  21. Klitzke S, Metreveli G, Peters A, Schaumann GE, Lang F (2015) The fate of silver nanoparticles in soil solution — sorption of solutes and aggregation. Sci Total Environ 535:54–60CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  22. Knauer K, Bucheli TD (2009) Nano-materials: research needs in agriculture. Rev Suisse Agric 41:341–345Google Scholar
  23. Ko KS, Ha K, Kong IC (2015) Effects of monotypic and binary mixtures of metal oxide nanoparticles on microbial growth in sandy soil collected from artificial recharge sites. Int J Mol Sci 16:27967–27977.  https://doi.org/10.3390/ijms161126066CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  24. Kumar N, Shah V, Walker VK (2011a) Perturbation of an arctic soil microbial community by metal nanoparticles. J Hazard Mater 190(1–3):816–822.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2011.04.005CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  25. Kwak JIL, Yoon SJ, An YJ (2017) Long-term effects of ZnO nanoparticles on exoenzyme activities in planted soils. Environ Eng Res 22(2):224–229. pISSN 1226-1025.  https://doi.org/10.4491/eer.2016.103CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  26. Kumar N, Shah V, Walker VK (2011b) Perturbation of an arctic soil microbial community by metal nanoparticles. J Hazard Mater 190(1–3):816–822.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jhazmat.2011.04.005CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  27. Lee WM, Kwak JII, An YJ (2012b) Effect of silver nanoparticles in crop plants Phaseolus radiatus and Sorghum bicolor: media effect on phytotoxicity. Chemosphere 86(5):491–499CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  28. Lee S, Kim S, Lee I (2012a) Effects of soil-plant interactive system on response to exposure to ZnO nanoparticles. J Microbiol Biotechnol 22:1264–1270CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  29. Ma XM, Geiser-Lee J, Deng Y, Kolmakov A (2010) Interactions between engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) and plants: phytotoxicity, uptake and accumulation. Sci Total Environ 408:3053–3061CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  30. Musante C, White JC (2010) Toxicity of silver and copper to Cucurbita pepo: differential effects of nano and bulk-size particles. Environ Toxicol 27(9):510–517.  https://doi.org/10.1002/tox.20667CrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  31. Mirzajani F, Askari H, Hamzelou S, Schober Y, Römpp A, Ghassempour A, Spengler B (2014) Proteomics study of silver nanoparticles toxicity on Bacillus thuringiensis. Ecotoxicol Environ Saf 100:22–130.  https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ecoenv.2013.10.009CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  32. Ottoni CA, Simões MF, Fernandes S, Dos Santos JG, da Silva ES, de Souza RF et al (2017) Screening of filamentous fungi for antimicrobial silver nanoparticles synthesis. AMB Express 7:31. Pmid: 28144889CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  33. Pallavi MCM, Srivastava R, Arora S, Sharma AK (2016) Impact assessment of silver nanoparticles on plant growth and soil bacterial diversity. 3 Biotech 6:254.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s13205-016-0567-7CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  34. Panpatte DG, Jhala YK, Shelat HN, Vyas RV (2016) Nanoparticles – the next generation technology for sustainable agriculture. In: Singh DP, Singh HB, Prabha R (eds) Microbial inoculants in sustainable agricultural productivity, Functional applications, vol 2. Springer, New Delhi, pp 289–300CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  35. Peyrot C, Wilkinson KJ, Desrosiers M, Sauvé S (2014) Effects of silver nanoparticles on soil enzyme activities with and without added organic matter. Environ Toxicol Chem 33:115–125CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  36. Różalska B, Sadowska B, Budzyńska A, Bernat P, Różalska S (2018) Biogenic nanosilver synthesized in Metarhizium robertsii waste mycelium extract – as a modulator of Candida albicans morphogenesis, membrane lipidome and biofilm. PLoS One 13(3):e0194254.  https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0194254CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  37. Rico CM, Majumdar S, Duarte-Gardea M, Peralta-Videa JR, Gardea-Torresdey JL (2011) Interaction of nanoparticles with edible plants and their possible implications in the food chain. J Agric Food Chem 59:3485–3498CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  38. Servin A, Elmer W, Mukherjee A, De la Torre-Roche R, Hamdi H, White JC, Bindraban P, Dimkpa C (2015) A review of the use of engineered nanomaterials to suppress plant disease and enhance crop yield. J Nanopart Res 17:92.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11051-015-2907-7CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  39. Sekhar YC, Ahammed SK, Prasad TNVKV, Jayalakshmi Devi RS (2017) Evaluation of the effect of mycogenic silver nanoparticles on soil exo-enzymes in groundnut growing soils. Int J Pure App Biosci 5(5):571–578.  https://doi.org/10.18782/2320-7051.3070CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  40. Schlich K, Hund-Rinke K (2015) Influence of soil properties on the effect of silver nanomaterials on microbial activity in five soils. Environ Pollut 196:321–330CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Sillen WMA, Thijs S, Abbamondi GR, Janssen J, Weyens N, White JC, Vangronsveld J (2015) Effects of silver nanoparticles on soil microorganisms and maize biomass are linked in the rhizosphere. Soil Biol Biochem 9:14–22CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Shah V, Collins D, Walker VK, Shah S (2014) The impact of engineered cobalt, iron, nickel and silver nanoparticles on soil bacterial diversity under field conditions. Environ Res Lett 9(2014):024001.  https://doi.org/10.1088/1748-9326/9/2/024001CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Shin YJ, Kwak JII, An YJ (2012) Evidence for the inhibitory effects of silver nanoparticles on the activities of soil exoenzymes. Chemosphere 88:524–529CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  44. Stampoulis D, Sinha SK, White JC (2009) Assay-dependent phytotoxicity of nanoparticles to plants. Environ Sci Technol 43(24):9473–9479.  https://doi.org/10.1021/es901695cCrossRefGoogle Scholar
  45. Tong Z, Bischoff M, Nies L, Applegate B, Turco RF (2007) Impact of fullerene (C60) on a soil microbial community. Environ Sci Technol 41(8):2985–2991.  https://doi.org/10.1021/es061953lCrossRefPubMedGoogle Scholar
  46. Yin L, Colman BP, McGill BM, Wright JP, Bernhardt ES (2012) Effects of silver nanoparticle exposure on germination and early growth of eleven wetland plants. PLoS One 7(10):e47674.  https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0047674CrossRefPubMedPubMedCentralGoogle Scholar
  47. You T, Liu D, Chen J, Yang Z, Dou R, Gao X, Wang L (2018) Effects of metal oxide nanoparticles on soil enzyme activities and bacterial communities in two different soil types. J Soils Sediments 18:211–221.  https://doi.org/10.1007/s11368-017-1716-2CrossRefGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Microbiology, Biotechnology and Nanotechnology Laboratory, Department of MicrobiologyEdo University IyamhoIyamhoNigeria

Personalised recommendations