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Agronomic Crops: Types and Uses

  • Sahrish Naz
  • Zartash Fatima
  • Pakeeza Iqbal
  • Amna Khan
  • Iqra Zakir
  • Sibgha Noreen
  • Haseeb Younis
  • Ghulam Abbas
  • Shakeel AhmadEmail author
Chapter

Abstract

Agronomy includes the crops which are used for food purpose and are known as staple crops. Well-known staple food crops are wheat, rice, corn, beans, etc. Major cultivated crops can be classified on the basis of their purpose. On the basis of this classification, major types of agronomic crops can be cereal, oil seed crop, pulses, fibre crops, sugar crops, forage crops, medicinal crops, roots and tuber crops, vegetable or garden crops, etc. All these crops are indispensable part of our life due to their various usage.

Keywords

Cereals Oilseed Pulses Fiber Sugar Forage Medicinal Vegetable Root crops 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2019

Authors and Affiliations

  • Sahrish Naz
    • 1
  • Zartash Fatima
    • 1
  • Pakeeza Iqbal
    • 2
  • Amna Khan
    • 3
  • Iqra Zakir
    • 1
  • Sibgha Noreen
    • 4
  • Haseeb Younis
    • 1
  • Ghulam Abbas
    • 1
  • Shakeel Ahmad
    • 1
    Email author
  1. 1.Department of AgronomyBahauddin Zakariya UniversityMultanPakistan
  2. 2.Department of BotanyGovernment College UniversityFaisalabadPakistan
  3. 3.Department of AgronomyUniversity of SargodhaSargodhaPakistan
  4. 4.Institute of Pure and Applied BiologyBahauddin Zakariya UniversityMultanPakistan

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