Envisioning Future Playful Interactive Environments for Animals

Part of the Gaming Media and Social Effects book series (GMSE)

Abstract

Play stands as one of the most natural and inherent behavior among the majority of living species, specifically humans and animals. Human play has evolved significantly over the years, and so have done the artifacts which allow us to play: from children playing tag games without any tools other than their bodies, to modern video games using haptic and wearable devices to augment the playful experience. However, this ludic revolution has not been the same for the humans’ closest companions, our pets. Recently, a new discipline inside the human–computer interaction (HCI) community, called animal–computer interaction (ACI), has focused its attention on improving animals’ welfare using technology. Several works in the ACI field rely on playful interfaces to mediate this digital communication between animals and humans. Until now, the development of these interfaces only comprises a single goal or activity, and its adaptation to the animals’ needs requires the developers’ intervention. This work analyzes the existing approaches, proposing a more generic and autonomous system aimed at addressing several aspects of animal welfare at a time: Intelligent Playful Environments for Animals. The great potential of these systems is discussed, explaining how incorporating intelligent capabilities within playful environments could allow learning from the animals’ behavior and automatically adapt the game to the animals’ needs and preferences. The engaging playful activities created with these systems could serve different purposes and eventually improve animals’ quality of life.

Keywords

Animal–computer interaction Games Playful Interaction design Ambient intelligence 

References

  1. Alfrink, K., van Peer, I., Lagerweij H, et al.: Pig Chase. Playing with Pigs project. (2012) www.playingwithpigs.nl
  2. Amat, M., Camps, T., Le, Brech S., Manteca, X.: Separation anxiety in dogs: the implications of predictability and contextual fear for behavioural treatment. Anim. Welf. 23(3), 263–266 (2014). doi:10.7120/09627286.23.3.263 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  3. Barker, S.B., Dawson, K.S.: The effects of animal-assisted therapy on anxiety ratings of hospitalized psychiatric patients. Psychiatr. Serv. 49(6), 797–801 (1998)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  4. Bateson, P., Martin, P.: Play, Playfulness, Creativity and Innovation. Cambridge University Press, New York (2013)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  5. Bekoff, M., Allen, C.: Intentional communication and social play: how and why animals negotiate and agree to play. In: Bekoff, M., Byers, J.A. (eds.) Animal Play Evolutionary. Comparative and Ecological Perspectives, pp. 97–114. Cambridge University Press, New York (1997)Google Scholar
  6. Burghardt, G.M.: The Genesis of Animal Play. Testing the Limits. MIT Press, Cambridge (2006)Google Scholar
  7. Catalá, A., Pons, P., Jaén, J., et al.: A meta-model for dataflow-based rules in smart environments: evaluating user comprehension and performance. Sci. Comput. Prog. 78(10), 1930–1950 (2013). doi:10.1016/j.scico.2012.06.010 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. Cheok, A.D., Tan, R.T.K.C., Peiris, R.L., et al.: Metazoa ludens: mixed-reality interaction and play for small pets and humans. IEEE Trans. Syst. Man. Cybern.—Part A Syst. Hum. 41(5), 876–891 (2011). doi:10.1109/TSMCA.2011.2108998 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  9. Costello, B., Edmonds, E.: A study in play, pleasure and interaction design. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Conference on Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces, pp. 76–91 (2007)Google Scholar
  10. Csikszentmihalyi, M.: Beyond Boredom and Anxiety. The Experience of Play in Work and Games. Jossey-Bass Publishers, Hoboken (1975)Google Scholar
  11. Filan, S.L., Llewellyn-Jones, R.H.: Animal-assisted therapy for dementia: a review of the literature. Int. Psychogeriatr. 18(4), 597–611 (2006). doi:10.1017/S1041610206003322 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  12. García-Herranz, M., Haya, P.A., Alamán, X.: Towards a ubiquitous end-user programming system for smart spaces. J. Univ. Comput. Sci. 16(12), 1633–1649 (2010). doi:10.3217/jucs-016-12-1633 Google Scholar
  13. Hirskyj-Douglas, I., Read, J.C.: Who is really in the centre of dog computer interaction? In: Adjunct Proceedings of the 11th Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment—Workshop on Animal Human Computer Interaction (2014)Google Scholar
  14. Hu, F., Silver, D., Trude, A.: LonelyDog@Home. In: International Conference Web Intelligence Intelligent Agent Technology—Workshops, 2007 IEEE/WIC/ACM IEEE, pp. 333–337, (2007)Google Scholar
  15. Huizinga, J.: Homo Ludens. Wolters-Noordhoff, Groningen (1985)Google Scholar
  16. Kamioka, H., Okada, S., Tsutani, K., et al.: Effectiveness of animal-assisted therapy: a systematic review of randomized controlled trials. Complement. Ther. Med. 22(2), 371–390 (2014). doi:10.1016/j.ctim.2013.12.016 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  17. Lee, S.P., Cheok, A.D., James, T.K.S., et al.: A mobile pet wearable computer and mixed reality system for human–poultry interaction through the internet. Pers. Ubiquit. Comput. 10(5), 301–317 (2006). doi:10.1007/s00779-005-0051-6 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  18. Leo, K., Tan, B.: User-tracking mobile floor projection virtual reality game system for paediatric gait and dynamic balance training. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Convention on Rehabilitation Engineering and Assistive Technology pp. 25:1–25:4 (2010)Google Scholar
  19. Mancini, C.: Animal-computer interaction: a manifesto. Mag. Interact. 18(4), 69–73 (2011). doi:10.1145/1978822.1978836 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  20. Mancini, C.: Animal-computer interaction (ACI): changing perspective on HCI, participation and sustainability. CHI ’13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM Press, New York, pp. 2227–2236 (2013)Google Scholar
  21. Mancini, C., van der Linden, J.: UbiComp for animal welfare: envisioning smart environments for kenneled dogs. In: Proceedings of the 2014 ACM International Joint Conference on Pervasive and Ubiquitous Computing, pp. 117–128 (2014)Google Scholar
  22. Mancini, C., Harris, R., Aengenheister, B., Guest, C.: Re-centering multispecies practices: a canine interface for cancer detection dogs. In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing System, pp. 2673–2682 (2015)Google Scholar
  23. Mancini, C., van der Linden, J., Bryan, J., Stuart, A.: Exploring interspecies sensemaking: dog tracking semiotics and multispecies ethnography. In: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Conference on Ubiquitous Computing—UbiComp ’12. ACM Press, New York, pp. 143–152 (2012)Google Scholar
  24. Mankoff, D., Dey, A.K., Mankoff, J., Mankoff, K.: Supporting interspecies social awareness: using peripheral displays for distributed pack awareness. In: Proceedings of the 18th Annual ACM Symposium on User interface Software and Technology, pp. 253–258 (2005)Google Scholar
  25. Maternaghan, C., Turner, K.J.: A configurable telecare system. In: Proceedings of the 4th International Conference on Pervasive Technologies Related to Assistive Environments—PETRA ’11. ACM Press, New York, pp. 14:1–14:8 (2011)Google Scholar
  26. Matsuzawa, T.: The Ai project: historical and ecological contexts. Anim. Cogn. 6(4), 199–211 (2003). doi:10.1007/s10071-003-0199-2 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  27. McGrath, R.E.: Species-appropriate computer mediated interaction. CHI ‘09 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM Press, New York, pp. 2529–2534 (2009)Google Scholar
  28. Mocholí, J.A., Jaén, J., Catalá, A.: A model of affective entities for effective learning environments. In: Innovations in Hybrid Intelligent Systems, pp. 337–344 (2007)Google Scholar
  29. Nijholt, A. (ed.): Playful User Interfaces. Springer, Singapore (2014)Google Scholar
  30. Norman, D.A.: The invisible computer. MIT Press, Cambridge (1998)Google Scholar
  31. Noz, F., An, J.: Cat cat revolution: an interspecies gaming experience. In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, pp. 2661–2664 (2011)Google Scholar
  32. Paldanius, M., Kärkkäinen, T., Väänänen-Vainio-Mattila, K., et al.: Communication technology for human-dog interaction: exploration of dog owners’ experiences and expectations. In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems. ACM Press, New York, pp. 2641–2650 (2011)Google Scholar
  33. Picard, R.W.: Affective Computing. MIT Press, Cambridge (1997)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  34. Pons, P., Jaén, J., Catalá, A.: Animal ludens: building intelligent playful environments for animals. In: Adjunct Proceedings of the 11th Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment—Workshop on Animal Human Computer Interaction (2014)Google Scholar
  35. Resner, B.: Rover@Home: Computer Mediated Remote Interaction Between Humans and Dogs. M.Sc. thesis, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge (2001)Google Scholar
  36. Ritvo, S.E., Allison, R.S.: Challenges related to nonhuman animal-computer interaction: usability and “liking”. In: Adjunct Proceedings of the 11th Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment—Workshop on Animal Human Computer Interaction (2014)Google Scholar
  37. Robinson, C., Mncini, C., Van Der Linden, J., et al.: Canine-centered interface design: supporting the work of diabetes alert dogs. In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems, pp. 3757–3766 (2014)Google Scholar
  38. Rumbaugh, D.M.: Language Learning by a Chimpanzee: The LANA Project. Academic Press, New York (1977)Google Scholar
  39. Rumbaugh, D.M.: Apes and their future in comparative psychology. Eye Psi Chi 18(1), 16–19 (2013)Google Scholar
  40. Rumbaugh, D.M., Gill, T.V., Brown, J.V., et al.: A computer-controlled language training system for investigating the language skills of young apes. Behav. Res. Methods Instrum. 5(5), 385–392 (1973)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  41. Schwartz, S.: Separation anxiety syndrome in cats: 136 cases (1991–2000). J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc. 220(7), 1028–1033 (2002). doi:10.2460/javma.2002.220.1028 CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  42. Schwartz, S.: Separation anxiety syndrome in dogs and cats. J. Am. Vet. Med. Assoc. 222(11), 1526–1532 (2003)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  43. Solomon, O.: What a dog can do: children with autism and therapy dogs in social interaction. Ethos J. Soc. Psychol. Anthropol. 38(1), 143–166 (2010). doi:10.1111/j.1548-1352.2010.01085.x Google Scholar
  44. Teh, K.S., Lee, S.P., Cheok, A.D.: Poultry. Internet: a remote human-pet interaction system. In: CHI ’06 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, pp. 251–254 (2006)Google Scholar
  45. Väätäjä, H., Pesonen, E.: Ethical issues and guidelines when conducting HCI studies with animals. In: CHI ’13 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, pp. 2159–2168 (2013)Google Scholar
  46. Väätäjä, H.: Animal welfare as a design goal in technology mediated human-animal interaction—opportunities with haptics. In: Adjunct Proceedings of the 11th Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment—Workshop on Animal Human Computer Interaction (2014)Google Scholar
  47. Weilenmann, A., Juhlin, O.: Understanding people and animals. In: Proceedings of the SIGCHI Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems—CHI ’11. ACM Press, New York, pp. 2631–2640 (2011)Google Scholar
  48. Weiser, M.: The computer for the 21st century. Sci. Am. 265(3), 94–104 (1991)CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  49. Westerlaken, M., Gualeni, S., Geurtsen, A.: Grounded zoomorphism: an evaluation methodology for ACI design. In: Adjunct Proceedings of the 11th Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment—Workshop on Animal Human Computer Interaction (2014)Google Scholar
  50. Westerlaken, M., Gualeni, S.: Felino: the philosophical practice of making an interspecies videogame. Philosophy of Computer Games Conference, pp. 1–12 (2014)Google Scholar
  51. Wingrave, C.A., Rose, J., Langston, T., LaViola, J.J.J.: Early explorations of CAT: canine amusement and training. In: CHI ’10 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems, pp. 2661–2669 (2010)Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Springer Science+Business Media Singapore 2015

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Grupo ISSI, Departamento de Sistemas Informáticos y ComputaciónUniversitat Politècnica de ValènciaValenciaSpain

Personalised recommendations