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Understanding Personal Epistemology

  • Yuh Huann TanEmail author
  • Seng Chee Tan
Chapter
  • 23 Downloads

Abstract

This chapter presents a literature review on the theoretical models of personal epistemology under three major frameworks: a uni-dimension developmental trajectory, a multi-dimension system of epistemic beliefs and manifold epistemological resources. Following that, we discuss cultural specificity of personal epistemology, in particular, the traditional Chinese epistemology that might influence the participants in our study.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Yusof Ishak Secondary SchoolMinistry of EducationSingaporeSingapore
  2. 2.National Institute of EducationNanyang Technological UniversitySingaporeSingapore

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