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Epilogue Intimate Present (and Futures)

  • Hendri Yulius Wijaya
Chapter
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Abstract

This chapter highlights the implication of the analysis this volume has made to the study of queer identity politics in Indonesia. Rather than focus on abstract terms such as globalization or liberalism, this chapter reveals the quotidian practices and discursive technologies deployed by Indonesian queer activists that have made intimate characteristics, namely gender and sexuality, possible to emerge in Indonesia. Situating the emergence of queer identity politics within local socio-cultural and political challenges and circumstances in this way, the analysis in this volume does not see ‘globalization’ as always producing singular and unidirectional effects, but rather as generating a multiplicity of effects in different settings and political contestations among different actors.

Keywords

Identity Interactions Gender Sexuality Politics Globalization 

References

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hendri Yulius Wijaya
    • 1
  1. 1.JakartaIndonesia

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