Advertisement

Intimate Assemblages: Sexual Technologies and Identity Politics in Indonesia

  • Hendri Yulius Wijaya
Chapter
  • 9 Downloads

Abstract

This chapter introduces the analytical framework of ‘intimate assemblages.’ It is a way of describing the interconnectedness, through both political collaborations and contestations, between transnational circuits of queer activisms, local queer movements, and the local anti-queer backlash, in shaping queer identities and sexualities as a salient political issue in Indonesia. At the heart of this interconnectedness is the roles of discursive sexual technologies that have enabled activists to generate specific queer identities and sociabilities, which in turn makes political mobilizations possible.

Keywords

Queer Activism Technology Assemblages Identity Politics Discourse 

References

  1. Adler, Libby. 2018. Gay Priori: A Queer Critical Legal Studies Approach to Law Reform. Durham and London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  2. Ahmed, Sara. 2019. What’s the Use? On the Uses of Use. Durham and London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  3. Altman, Dennis, and Jonathan Symons. 2016. Queer Wars. Cambridge: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  4. Berry, Chris, Fran Martin, and Audrey Yue (Eds.). 2003. Mobile Cultures: New Media in Queer Asia. Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  5. Blackwood, Evelyn. 1998. “‘Tombois’ in West Sumatra: Constructing Masculinity and Erotic Desire.” Cultural Anthropology 13 (4): 491–521.Google Scholar
  6. ———. 2010. Falling into the Lesbi World: Desire and Difference in Indonesia. Honolulu: University of Hawaii Press.Google Scholar
  7. Boellstorff, Tom. 2005. The Gay Archipelago: Sexuality and Nation in Indonesia. Princeton and Oxford: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  8. Boellstorff, Tom. 2007. A Coincidence of Desires: Anthropology, Queer Studies, Indonesia. Durham: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  9. Brettschneider, Marla, Susan Burgess, and Christine Keating. 2017. “Introduction.” In LGBTQ Politics: A Critical Reader, edited by Marla Brettschneider, Susan Burgess, and Christine Keating, 1–9. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  10. Cavalcante, Andre. 2018. Struggling for Ordinary: Media and Transgender Belonging in Everyday Life. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  11. Chiang, Howard, and Alvin K. Wong. 2017. “Asia Is Burning: Queer Asia as Critique.” Culture, Theory and Critique 58 (2): 121–126.Google Scholar
  12. Chua, Lynette J. 2019. The Politics of Love in Myanmar: LGBT Mobilization and Human Rights as a Way of Life. Stanford, CA: Stanford University Press.Google Scholar
  13. Collins, Patricia Hill. 2019. Intersectionality as Critical Social Theory. Durham and London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  14. Comella, Lynn. 2017. Vibrator Nation: How Feminist Sex-Toy Stores Changed the Business of Pleasure. Durham and London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  15. Cruz-Malavé, Arnaldo, and Martin F. Manalansan IV. 2002. “Dissident Sexualities/Alternative Globalisms.” In Queer Globalizations: Citizenship and the Afterlife of Colonialism, edited by Arnaldo Cruz-Malavé and Martin F. Manalansan IV, 1–10. New York and London: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  16. Davies, Sharyn Graham. 2018. “Gender and Sexual Plurality in Indonesia: Past and Present.” In Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Indonesia, edited by Robert W. Hefner, 322–334. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  17. Fealy, Greg, and Sally White. 2008. “Introduction.” In Expressing Islam: Religious Life and Politics in Indonesia, edited by Greg Fealy and Sally White, 1–12. Singapore: Institute of South East Asian Studies (ISEAS) Publishing.Google Scholar
  18. Fealy, Greg. 2019. “Reformasi and the Decline of Liberal Islam.” In Activists in Transition: Progressive Politics in Democratic Indonesia, edited by Thushara Dibley and Michele Ford, 117–134. Ithaca and London: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  19. Fischel, Joseph. 2019. Screw Consent: A Better Politics of Sexual Justice. Oakland, CA: California University Press.Google Scholar
  20. Ghaziani, Amin, and Matt Brim. 2019. “Queer Methods: Four Provocations for an Emerging Field.” In Imagining Queer Methods, edited by Amin Ghaziani and Matt Brim, 3–27. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  21. Gross, Aeyal. 2019. “Gay Governance: A Queer Critique.” In Governance Feminism: Notes from the Field, edited by Janet Halley, Prabha Kotiswaran, Rachel Rebouché, and Hila Shamir, 344–374. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  22. Halberstam, Jack. 2018. Trans*: A Quick and Quirky Account of Gender Variability. Oakland, CA: University of California Press.Google Scholar
  23. Hawkins, Gay, Emily Potter, and Kane Race. 2015. Plastic Water: The Social and Material Life of Bottled Water. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press.Google Scholar
  24. Hefner, Robert. 2018. “The Religious Field: Plural Legacies and Contemporary Contestations.” In Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Indonesia, edited by Robert W. Hefner, 211–225. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  25. Hermawan, Ary. 2016. “Why AILA Is a Bigger Threat to Freedom Than FPI.” The Jakarta Post, August 30. https://www.thejakartapost.com/news/2016/08/30/commentary-why-aila-is-a-bigger-threat-to-freedom-than-the-fpi.html.
  26. Heryanto, Ariel. 2018. “Popular Culture and Identity Politics.” In Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Indonesia, edited by Robert W. Hefner, 357–368. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  27. Horton, Helena. 2016. “Instant Noodles and Formula Milk Are ‘Making Babies Gay’ Says Mayor.” The Telegraph, February 27. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/newstopics/howaboutthat/12175797/instant-noodles-formula-milk-making-babies-gay-indonesian-mayor.html.
  28. Human Rights Watch. 2016a. ‘These Political Games Ruin Our Lives’: Indonesia’s LGBT Community Under Threat. New York, NY: Human Rights Watch.Google Scholar
  29. ———. 2016b. “UN Makes History on Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity.” Human Rights Watch, June 30. https://www.hrw.org/news/2016/06/30/un-makes-history-sexual-orientation-gender-identity.
  30. Hurley, Natasha. 2018. Circulating Queerness: Before the Gay and Lesbian Novel. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  31. Jackson, Peter A. 2011a. “Queer Bangkok After the Millennium: Beyond Twentieth-Century Paradigms.” In Queer Bangkok, edited by Peter A. Jackson, 1–14. Hongkong: Hongkong University Press.Google Scholar
  32. ———. 2011b. “Bangkok’s Early Twenty-First-Century Queer Boom.” In Queer Bangkok, edited by Peter A. Jackson, 17–42. Hongkong: Hongkong University Press.Google Scholar
  33. ———. 2011c. “Capitalism, LGBT Activism, and Queer Autonomy in Thailand.” In Queer Bangkok, edited by Peter A. Jackson, 195–204. Hongkong: Hongkong University Press.Google Scholar
  34. Jackson, Peter, Fran Martin, Mark McLelland, and Audrey Yue, eds. 2008. AsiaPacifiQueer: Rethinking Genders and Sexualities. Urbana: University of Illinois Press.Google Scholar
  35. Kugle, Scott Alan. 2013. Living Out Islam: Voices of Gay, Lesbian, and Transgender Muslims. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  36. Latour, Bruno. 2007. Reassembling the Social an Introduction to Actor-Network-Theory. Oxford: Oxford University Press.Google Scholar
  37. Lindsey, Tim. 2018. “Islamization, Law, and the Indonesian Courts: The More Things Change ….” In Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Indonesia, edited by Robert W. Hefner, 226–236. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  38. Massad, Joseph A. 2007. Desiring Arabs. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.Google Scholar
  39. McGregor, Katharine. 2018. “Historical Justice and the Case of the 1965 Killings.” In Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Indonesia, edited by Robert W. Hefner, 129–139. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  40. Moreau, Julie. 2017. “Political Science and the Study of LGBT Social Movements in the Global South.” In LGBTQ Politics: A Critical Reader, edited by Marla Brettschneider, Susan Burgess, and Christine Keating, 439–457. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  41. Munir, Maimunah. 2008. “Indonesian Queer: Non-normative Sexualities in Indonesian Recent Films.” MA thesis, University of Sydney.Google Scholar
  42. Murib, Zein. 2017. “Rethinking GLBT as a Political Category in U.S. Politics.” In LGBTQ Politics: A Critical Reader, edited by Marla Brettschneider, Susan Burgess, and Christine Keating, 14–33. New York: New York University Press.Google Scholar
  43. Murtagh, Ben. 2013. Genders and Sexualities in Indonesian Cinema: Constructing Gay, Lesbi and Waria Identities on Screen. Hoboken: Routledge.Google Scholar
  44. Neville, Lucy. 2018. Girls Who Like Boys Who Like Boys Women and Gay Male Pornography and Erotica. Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan.Google Scholar
  45. Oetomo, Dédé. 2016. “Q&A: Dede Oetomo on the LGBT Panic” (Interview by Indonesia at Melbourne). Indonesia at Melbourne, March 17. https://indonesiaatmelbourne.unimelb.edu.au/interview-dede-oetomo-on-the-lgbt-panic/.
  46. Oetomo, Dédé, and Tom Boellstorff. 2015. “Afterword: Reflections on Sexual Rights, Politics and Sexuality Studies in Indonesia.” In Sex and Sexualities in Contemporary Indonesia, edited by Linda Rae Bennett and Sharyn Graham Davies, 307–317. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  47. Phillips, John. 2006. “Agencement/Assemblage.” Theory, Culture & Society 23 (2–3): 108–109.Google Scholar
  48. Preciado, Paul B. 2018. Countersexual Manifesto. Translated by Kevin Gerry Dunn. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  49. Puar, Jasbir K. 2017. Terrorist Assemblages: Homonationalism in Queer Times-Tenth Anniversary Expanded Edition. Durham and London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  50. Robinson, Kathryn. 2015. “Masculinity, Sexuality, and Islam”. In Sex and Sexualities in Contemporary Indonesia, edited by Linda Rae Bennett and Sharyn Graham Davies, 51–68. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  51. Ruti, Mari. 2018. Penis Envy and Other Bad Feelings: The Emotional Costs of Everyday Life. New York: Columbia University Press.Google Scholar
  52. Salim, Arskal. 2018. “The Special Status of Islamic Aceh.” In Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Indonesia, edited by Robert W. Hefner, 237–245. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  53. Stulberg, Lisa M. 2018. LGBTQ Social Movements. Cambridge, UK: Polity Press.Google Scholar
  54. Tang, Shawna. 2017. Postcolonial Lesbian Identities in Singapore: Re-thinking Global Sexualities. London: Routledge.Google Scholar
  55. Tempo. 2016. “Minister: LGBT Movement More Dangerous Than Nuclear Warfare.” Tempo, February 23. https://en.tempo.co/read/747534/minister-lgbt-movement-more-dangerous-than-nuclear-warfare.
  56. Tsing, Anna Lowenhaupt. 2015. The Mushroom at the End of the World: On the Possibility of Life in Capitalist Ruins. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press.Google Scholar
  57. UNDP, USAID (United Nations Development Programme and United States Agency for International Development). 2014. Being LGBT in Asia: Indonesia Country Report. Bangkok: UNDP.Google Scholar
  58. Waidzunas, Tom. 2015. The Straight Line: How the Fringe Science of Ex-Gay Therapy Reoriented Sexuality. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press.Google Scholar
  59. Weintraub, Andrew N. 2018. “Nation, Islam, and Gender in Dangdut, Indonesia’s Most Popular Music.” In Routledge Handbook of Contemporary Indonesia, edited by Robert W. Hefner, 369–377. London and New York: Routledge.Google Scholar
  60. Wichelen, Sonja van. 2010. Religion, Politics and Gender in Indonesia: Disputing the Muslim Body. Oxon: Routledge.Google Scholar
  61. Wiegman, Robyn. 2019. “Eve’s Triangles: Queer Studies Besides Itself.” In Reading Sedgwick, edited by Lauren Berlant, 242–273. Durham and London: Duke University Press.Google Scholar
  62. Wieringa, Saskia E. 2019. “Is the Recent Wave of Homophobia in Indonesia Unexpected?” In Contentious Belonging, edited by Greg Fealy and Ronit Ricci, 113–132. Singapore: ISEAS Publishing.Google Scholar
  63. Wijaya, Hendri, and Sharyn Graham Davies. 2019. “The Unfulfilled Promise of Democracy: Lesbian and Gay Activism and Indonesia.” In Activists in Transition: Progressive Politics in Democratic Indonesia, edited by Thushara Dibley and Michele Ford, 153–170. Ithaca, NY: Cornell University Press.Google Scholar
  64. Williams, Rhiannon. 2014. “Facebook’s 71 Gender Options Come to UK Users.” The Telegraph, June 27. https://www.telegraph.co.uk/technology/facebook/10930654/Facebooks-71-gender-options-come-to-UK-users.html.
  65. Wotherspoon, Garry. 2016. Gay Sydney: A History. Sydney, NSW: NewSouth Publishing.Google Scholar
  66. Yue, Audrey. 2017. “Trans-Singapore: Some Notes Towards Queer Asia as Method.” Inter-Asia Cultural Studies 18 (1): 10–24.Google Scholar
  67. Yulius, Hendri. 2017. “Over the Rainbow.” New Mandala, February 23. https://www.newmandala.org/over-the-rainbow/.
  68. Yulius, Hendri, Shawna Tang, and Baden Offord. 2018. “The Globalization of LGBT Identity and Same-Sex Marriage as a Catalyst of Neo-Institutional Values: Singapore and Indonesia in Focus.” In Global Perspectives on Same-Sex Marriage, edited by Bronwyn Winter, Maxime Forest, and Réjane Sénac, 171–196. Cham, Switzerland: Palgrave Macmillan. Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Hendri Yulius Wijaya
    • 1
  1. 1.JakartaIndonesia

Personalised recommendations