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Locating the “Everyday” and the “Offline” in Online Christianity

  • Meng Yoe Tan
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Abstract

This chapter is a theoretical discussion on the relationship between the online and offline contexts of digital religion. The chapter develops a working theory of online/everyday religion over a few layers of theoretical discourse. Firstly, it shows that it is difficult to measure concepts like authenticity, experience, or any form of spiritual transaction by studying online texts alone. The discussion then progresses to the need to highlight the everyday experience of the human when considering online texts. In other words, if we consider online religious expressions, such as those on blogs or social media, as one of many components that make up everyday religion, then studying it in tandem with the offline would yield a much richer interpretation of online religion. Along with this argument is the proposal to adopt Bruno Latour’s actor-network theory as an analytical tool to trace the linkage points between the online and offline environments in order to infer any form spiritual impact that online religious practices may have on individuals.

Keywords

Actor-network theory Everyday religion Online/offline Blog Authenticity 

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Meng Yoe Tan
    • 1
  1. 1.Monash University MalaysiaBandar SunwayMalaysia

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