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An Analysis of Legislative Measures on Gender Equality and Women’s Inclusion

  • Radha Wagle
  • Soma Pillay
  • Wendy Wright
Chapter
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Abstract

This chapter presents a review of Nepalese government policies focused towards gender equality and women’s inclusion and examines the effectiveness of policies and other interventions for women’s inclusion from historical to current times.

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Copyright information

© The Author(s) 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Radha Wagle
    • 1
  • Soma Pillay
    • 2
  • Wendy Wright
    • 3
  1. 1.Ministry of Forests and EnvironmentKathmanduNepal
  2. 2.Federation Business SchoolFederation University Australia Berwick CampusMelbourneAustralia
  3. 3.School of Health and Life SciencesFederation University AustraliaGippslandAustralia

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