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Changing Theoretical Perspectives on Transnational Mobility: A Review of the Literature

  • Rosalind Latiner RabyEmail author
  • Yi Leaf Zhang
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Abstract

This chapter creates a mapping of theories found in the literature on international students published from 2009–2019 to show what has existed in the field. The purpose of this research is to chart theoretical constructs used to interpret international students and to categorize current research with the intent to analyze trends on those who are studying international students. Findings show that the study of international students is an emerging field because there is a lack of commonality in how the field is researched. It also shows that a range of theories are used to study the fields that are aligned with specific academic associations. Finally, there is a varied focus on author’s affiliations, which has the opportunity to represent international perspectives and on the hosting institutions which are not all located in the Global North.

Keywords

International student Theories Literature review Community college Higher education Neo-liberalism Humanism Post-modernism Post-colonalism 

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© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, College of EducationCalifornia State UniversityNorthridge, Los AngelesUSA
  2. 2.Educational Leadership and Policy Studies, College of EducationThe University of Texas at ArlingtonArlingtonUSA

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