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Self-Study Informed by Pragmatism and Schwab’s Commonplaces

  • Chris J. North
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Part of the Self-Study of Teaching and Teacher Education Practices book series (STEP, volume 21)

Abstract

Self-study is an excellent research methodology for outdoor educators because of the tangible outcomes for practice. The theoretical framework for this self-study research rests on pragmatism and Schwab’s commonplaces. Pragmatism provides a way to navigate the divergent pressures on both outdoor education and initial teacher education because, according to pragmatism, truth claims are based on how convincing an argument is. Educational change has been dominated by “bandwagons” and “fads” due to the dominance of one or other particular discourse. In order to create balanced curriculum change, Schwab recommends bringing the perspectives of the four key commonplaces to bear on any educational innovation: learners, teachers, subject area and milieu. I demonstrate how this self-study has been influenced by pragmatism and the commonplaces. Self-study research is defined through LaBoskey’s criteria with a particular focus on trustworthiness and data analysis.

Keywords

Commonplaces Methodology Schwab Self-study Pragmatism 

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© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  • Chris J. North
    • 1
  1. 1.University of CanterburyChristchurchNew Zealand

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