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Campus Sustainability

  • Kerry ShephardEmail author
Chapter
Part of the Education for Sustainability book series (EDFSU)

Abstract

Is the university campus just a place or something more? We explore here the campus sustainability movement and the notion of ‘institution as role model’. This chapter reviews how campus sustainability can be measured and promoted and focuses on being carbon neutral, selling food and beverages to students and some sociocultural expectations. On the way, we look at governance issues around campus sustainability and if doing well in one aspect of campus sustainability can compensate for doing not so well in another. Readers might wonder if this is education or politics or something in between.

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Copyright information

© Springer Nature Singapore Pte Ltd. 2020

Authors and Affiliations

  1. 1.Higher Education Development CentreUniversity of OtagoDunedinNew Zealand

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